Warminster  ~   Horningsham  ~   Imber  ~   Longbridge Deverill
War Memorials

This site is dedicated to all the men & women associated with Warminster, Horningsham, Imber, Longbridge Deverill, who died in the service of their country from World War 1 until today.


WARMINSTER - WW1

J.Adlam
R.E.Akers
W.Angell
A.E.Arnold
W.F.Ball
E.A.Bassett
W.J. Beak
L.Berwick
J.Brown
P.W.J. Brown
W.Bull
F.Burgess
W.H.Burgess
R. B. Butcher
F.H.Butler
J.S.Butler
W.S.Cane
H.J.Carr
E.W.Carter
R.Compton

S.Compton
G.H.Cooper
V.Creed
A.Curtis
S.Curtis
S.A.Curtis
W.C.Curtis
H.E.Daniells
S.Dixon
W.Doughty
J.H.Edwards
C.Elloway
J.A.Everest
T.Everley
T.Farley
W.Franklin
H.Gaisford
A.J.Garrett
L.E.Garrett

P.D.Garrett
W.Garrett
H.Jones
A.V. Greenland
A.J.Hall
H.T.Hicks
H.Hill
O.E.Hiscock
F.Hobbs
E.C.Hoddinott
A.L.Holton
W.T.Holton
F.Howell
Frederick Howell
A.Hudd
W.Humphries
A.James
E.S.James
H.E.H.James
A.J.Kill

C.Northover
A.J.Parham
E.J.Knee
H.D.Labrum
J.Lewer
E.Maidment
W.H. Mead
D.Mees
H.J.Mitchelmore
S.Moore
F.R.Morgan
S.H.Naile
C.Nash
J.Newall
T.A.Noise
E.F.Norris
F.Norris
R.Norris
W.H.Pearce


O.G.Penny
E.D.Perry
E.W.Pope
F.Pope
B.Price
G.Price
E.H.Prince
G.Prince
H.F.Rendell
J.Rose
K. Sanderson
R.Scott
T.Self
H.R.Sims
W.G.Smith
W.C.Strong
T.H.Stubbs
H.Symes
S.Tancock
W.Taylor

W.Taylor
F.Thompson
J.A.J. Tisseman
W.Titford
A.E.Titt
J.F.Titt
F.Tucker
W.C.Turner
E.T.Udall
H.G.Webber
C.Whatley
H.J.Whatley
P.Whatley
C.White
V.W.White
W.Youdell

WARMINSTER - WW11

I.G.Baker
E.G.Ball
F.Ball
D.D.Bowie
K.Bray
A.R.C.Butterworth
G.Carhart
M.C.Cave
R.Chambers

A.Coates
J.C.Collins
T.Copestake
S.W.Cousins
H.J.Curtis
J.Curtis
R.D.Doel
A.Dredge
R.G.Claydon

P.Dunn
W.Evans
V.Forde
A.H.Fox
J.H.Gadd
J.C.Haining
E.R.R.Hannon
J.W.Hinton
C.W.Holton

H.Holton
M.C.Holton
C.E.Hudd
E.H.Jenkins
R.T.Jones
C.H.Knee
C.H.Payne
W.F.Pearce
R.H.Penn

R.H.Phelps
D.Pitcher
A.E.Prince
R.Rimington
G.W.Salmons
D.Sherwood
R.A.E.Silcox
H.J.Stokes
W.Stokes

D.P.Teichman
P.R.Teichman
J.Thorne
W.J.C.Turner
W.E.Watson

 
COLD WAR
AFGHANISTAN
 

H.Fitz                                          A.D.Hotine

THE STONEMASON

The memorial monument was designed and crafted by Mr.Egerton Strong of the town. That family was long-established in Warminster and his ancestors had worked for Sir Christopher Wren during the re-building of St.Paul's Cathedral, after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The monument is made of Box-ground Bath stone, and stands 21 feet tall. It bears interwoven rope-work and symbols of ancient Egyptian art. The site was donated to Warminster by Lord Thomas Thynne KG., 5th. Marquis of Bath, and around 2,000 people attended its unveiling on Sunday 29th.of May 1921. At that time it bore the names of 115 men, associated with Warminster, that fell in the Great War, 1914-1918. The monument was re-dedicated on the 6th.of November 1949, with the names of 52 men, associated with the town, that died in the service of this country during World War II,1939-1945. On the 10th.of November 2010 a ceremony was held to officially open a new layout, access, paving and garden of remembrance. A memorial bench was presented by the Warminster branch of the Royal British Legion on the 12th.of April 2011, which was the 90th. anniversary of that worthy institution. Since then, two more names have been added.
The monument bears the following names :

WORLD WAR ONE NAMES

                        

John (Jack) Adlam was born in Warminster during 1883, and was the son of William and Emily Emma Adlam (nee Reynolds). In 1891, the family lived at 66 Pound Street, John's father being a maltster's labourer and his mother a silk weaver. John was the third son, and by 1901 his father was working away from home in Frome, and the family had moved to 29 Chapel Street, Warminster. John became a gardener's labourer and in 1906 married Ethel Louisa Brown. In 1911 the couple were living at 24 Chapel Street, with John working as a furnace man. They had at least one child, Cyril John Adlam born in 1916. At the time of John's death in Warminster, on the 29th. of November 1918, John and Ethel were living at 27 Chapel Street. He had served as a private, regimental number 26916 in the depot battalion, The Devonshire Regiment. He died, poignantly only eighteen days after the Armistice had been signed, signifying the end of World War I. John's memorial is in Christchurch, New F3, Warminster. As John received no medals, it is presumed that he had not served abroad.

                        

Rupert Eustace Akers was born in Surbiton Hill, Kingston, Surrey in 1888, the son of Rupert and Jane Mary Akers. During 1891 the family were still living in Surbiton, but by 1901 had moved to Devizes in Wiltshire. In 1911 his parents were living at Market Lavington, Wiltshire. He attested for the The Royal Engineers at Guildford in February 1915, age 26 years and ten months, his trade being an engine fireman for the Great Western Railway, and he was then living at Chobham, Surrey. He left Chatham on the 12th. of February 1915, and sailing from Marseilles in January 1916 disembarked at Salonika in the Balkans. He served as a sapper (regimental number 65784) with 103 or 108 Field Company, and was killed in action on the 28th.of November 1916 at Salonika. At that time his next of kin was his father Rupert, then resident at Liskeard Villa, Victoria Road, Warminster. During 1919, Rupert's effects were sent on to his fiancee Gwendolyn Cary Tyer, who resided at Uxbridge Road, Ealing, west London. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1915 Star. His name is commemorated on the Doiran memorial in Greece. Two of Rupert's brothers were in the services during the war. John Harold served in the Dorset Regiment and Norman William was aboard HMS Satellite.

                        

Walter William Angell was born about 1881 at Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire, the first son of Walter and Hannah Angell. During 1901,Walter was living in Hampstead, Lodon working as an assurance agent. Around 1906 he married Flora ........., and by 1911 they were living in Swindon. Walter was an assistant superintendant for the Prudential Assurance Co. Ltd. During the war, he served as aprivate in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, number 32520. He died in France on the 1st. of July 1919, possibly whilst disposing of ammunition. In his will, proved in Salisbury in September 1919 he left £254 to his widow Flora of 93 Portway, Warminster. They do not appear to have had any children. Walter was buried in Les Barangues Military Cemetery, Sangatte, Calais, France. Ref : XVIII A 21 a.

                        

Arthur Evelyn Arnold was born in Sutton Veny, Wiltshire during 1895. He was the second son of Samuel, a head gardener and Elizabeth (Annie) Arnold (nee White). His father died in 1910, and by 1911 the family, had moved to Marsh Villa, Marsh Street, Warminster. Arthur was then working as a Post Office telegraph messenger. He enlisted in Warminster and joined the 6th.Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death he was a private, regimental number 22918. He died of wounds in the France/ Flanders (Belgium) campaign, on the 24th.of July 1916. The day before that, the battle of Pozieres bridge, Somme had taken place. It would have been within weeks of his twenty first birthday. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He was buried in the Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz,ref 1vI5. At the time of his death, his mother Elizabeth was living at 14 Bell Hill, Warminster.  

                        


William Frank Ball was born in Longbridge Deverill, Wiltshire early in 1892. He was the fourth son of Alfred, a maltster's labourer and Rose Ball (nee Humfries), who were married there in 1866. During 1910, the family lived at 6 Chapel Street, Warminster, and the following year were at 27 Bread Street, Frank working as a farm labourer. He enlisted in Warminster in November 1915, his address was 31 Bread Street. He was almost 24 and a roadman by trade, 5'2 1/2” tall with a chest measurement of 35”. Within days he had joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps at Winchester depot, regimental number R/17231. In April 1916 the regiment was posted to France and joined the 7th.Battalion Rifle Brigade. William was transferred to the 25th. Battalion Machine Gun Corps during February 1917, as part of the 41st. Brigade. Having spent two weeks leave in England during September 1917, he returned to France. William was killed in action (or died of wounds) on the 27th.of May 1918, and his effects were to be sent to his mother Rosabel, still at 31 Bread Street. At the time of his death he was a private, regimental number 73205. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, but for years his mother petitioned the War Office for them to be sent to her. Finally in April 1922 she received them! He is commemorated on Soissons Memorial, Ainse

                        

Ernest Arthur Bassett was born in Warminster during 1894, the second son of Richard Henry and Sarah (Ellen) Bassett, who was the widow of ….. Pearce. During 1901 the family were living at 35 Brook Street, Warminster and the father was a hawker by trade. His father died in 1907, and by 1911 the family were living at 57 Brook Street, with Ernest working as a carter. Ernest enlisted in the King's Royal Rifle Corps, regimental number R/17729, but at the time of his death was a private in the Machine Gun Corps, regimental number 30461. He died of wounds on the 18th.of August 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. Ernest was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is buried in the Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, no 3 II E 10

                        

William James F. Beak was born during 1887 in Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire the eldest son of William James Francis and Anna Maria Beak (nee Daniells). His parents had been married in 1882, his father being a corn miller in Westbury, Wiltshire. By 1891, his father was a licensed victualler and running the King's Head, in Chitterne, Wiltshire. By 1911 William junior and his sister Ethel Annie were living at 48 Limerston Street, Chelsea, with William working as a clerk. He enlisted at St. Paul's churchyard, London, Middlesex and was at the time living in Golders Green, north London. At the time of his death he was a bombardier in the 261 Sge. Battery Royal Garrison Artillery, regimental number 93406. William died of wounds on the 10th.of April 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is buried the Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery Gr.VII A 7.
At the time of his death, his parents were living at 2 Sambourne Road, Warminster.

                        

Lawrence Berwick was living in Jondaryan, Queensland, Australia when he enlisted in the Australian 11th. Light Horse as a private no:752. In Egypt he was transferred to the 49th. Battalion, who moved to France in February 1916. He was killed in action on the 2nd April 1917, and buried in Vaulx Hill Cemetery, Vaulx-Vraucourt IG3. He married Evelyn Hilda the daughter of Frederick James Button of Warminster.

                        

According to the Army 'dead' records, James Brown was born in West Lavington, Wiltshire. He enlisted at Warminster, and at the time of his death was a private, regimental number 201905 in the 1 /4th. (T.F. i.e Territorial) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He was killed in action on the 10th.of April 1918 in Egypt. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery GR. B148
n.b. A James Brown was born in 1887 at West Lavington. He was the son of George and Elizabeth Brown of Lavington Lane, West Lavington. By 1911 James was living with his parents at Manor Farm Cottage, Steeple Ashton, and he was a carter's boy on a farm.

                        

Percy William James Brown was born around 1897 in Warminster, the first son of 'Willie' a painter and paperhanger and Agnes Amy Brown (nee Barnett). They had married in Warminster during May 1896. In 1901, the family were living at 41 Pound Street, Warminster,  Percy enlisted at West Durrington, Wiltshire, and at the time of his death was a private, regimental number 2787 in the 2 /4th. (T.F.) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He was captured at Kut on 29th April 1916 and died at Aflon Karahissar on 6th Dec 1916. He was awarded the Victory medal and 1914-1915 Star. He is buried in Baghdad War Cemetery XX1 J39.

                        

William Joseph Bull was born in Frome during 1889, the son of Henry (1854-) and Sarah Ann Bull (1867-1950, nee Ashman). In 1901 they were living at 7 Wiltshire Buildings, Frome, with Henry working in a vinegar factory. By 1911 the family were living at 9 Wiltshire Buildings, Frome. William at that time was serving in the 2nd. Battalion (Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry stationed at Sliema, Malta. In the summer of 1913 he married Dorcas Lily Ashman Robbins, the eldest of eight children of Oliver and Lily Letitia Robbins (nee Ashman), who lived at 11 Hensford Marsh. In August 1914 he sailed to France aboard HMAS. Braemar Castle, He served in Flanders, and in the battle of Ploegestrete. At the time he was killed in action on the 9th. May 1915, William was serving as a private no: 7883 in C company, 1st. Battalion (Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry, 11th Brigade, 4th Division at Frezenberg Ridge, Ypres. His name is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial,Ypres Panel 21, and in Trinity Church, Frome. William and Dorcas's son William Leslie 'Sonny' Bull was born around the time of William seniors death. He died in Bristol during 1976.
n.b. William's elder brother Harold Alfred Bull was born in Frome during 1886 and enlisted in Devizes. He was killed in action, serving as a private in the 1st. Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, no: 6797 on the 14th. September 1914 in France. He had married Margaret A. Legge in Monmouthshire in 1914 and had a son, Harold James (1914-1986).

                        

Frederick Burgess was born during 1882 in Warminster, the sixth son of Samuel, a housepainter and Ellen Burgess. By 1901 Samuel had died, and the family was living at 27 Marsh Street, Warminster, with Frederick working as a labourer on the roads. He enlisted at Warminster as a private in the 14th.Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, regimental number 28046. Frederick was killed in action on the 26th.of October 1917, aged 36. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Frederick's name appears on the Tyne Cot Memorial, about 9 kilometres east of Ieper (Ypres), Belgium.

                        

William Herbert Burgess was born during 1886 in Warminster, the son of Samuel, a photographer and Sarah Ann Burgess (nee Cundick). Sarah died in 1896, and Samuel married Clara ….....from Frome, Somerset. During 1901 the family were living at 3-5 Brook Street, Warminster and William was a grocer's errand boy. During 1910 he married Beatrice Annie Hill in Warminster. She was a daughter of Comfort Young, who had been born in Warminster during 1858. By 1911 they were living at 8 Chapel Street, Warminster and had a daughter Phyllis Sarah aged seven months. William was working as an engineer's labourer. He joined the Royal Navy, number SS/100673, and was a stoker 1st. Class aboard HMS Tipperary when she was sunk on the 1st. of June 1916,(see H.E. Daniells). He is buried in Hvidbjerg on Aa churchyard, Denmark, (south of the church).  
During 1928 William's widow married Edward George Anderson in Melbourne, Australia.

                        

Robert (Bert) Bucknole Butcher was killed in action in the Departement of Marne on the 28th. of May 1918. He was born in Warminster around 1895, the fourth son and ninth child of Edwin J. Butcher, a master grocer, baker and confectioner of 21 Silver Street in the town. His mother was Henrietta Ellen (nee Bucknole). During 1911 the family were still living at 21 Silver Street, and Robert enlisted in Warminster. He was killed in action on the 28th. of May 1918, and at the time of his death, he was a private in the 10th. Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, regimental number 57426. His final resting place is in Chambrecy Military Cemetery, France, VII B 2. He is also remembered on a memorial plaque in Warminster Baptist Church.

                        

Frank Hubert Butler was born during 1883 in Warminster, the eldest son of Frank, a county bailiff and Amy H.Butler (nee Pitman). By 1901 the family were living at 11 Market Place, Warminster.
Frank attended Lord Weymouth's School in Warminster. He enlisted at Trowbridge, Wiltshire and was enrolled in the 1/4th. (T.F.) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 200792. Whilst serving in F Company, he died in Egypt on the 16th.of November 1918, just five days after the Armistice had been signed. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1914-1915 Star. He is buried in the Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery, E. 187.

                        

John Stuart Butler was born on the 8th.of May 1896 in Warminster, the second son of John G. and Harriott Butler, both born in Gloucestershire. During 1901, the family were living at 3 St.John's Terrace, Boreham Road in the town and John senior was a coachman. By 1911 the family were still living at that address, with John working as an office boy. John joined the Royal Navy, number J. 17910 (PO) Portsmouth, and was killed on the 27th. of October 1916, as an able-bodied seaman aboard HMS Mohawk (destroyer). I believe he is buried in St. John's churchyard, Warminster.

                        

William Stuart Cane was born in Warminster during 1879, the son of Frederick William, a letter carrier and Emily Cane (nee Elloway). During 1891 the family were living at 3 Scotland Cottages, Portway, Warminster. By 1901, William had become a school teacher and was boarding at 45 Parliament Street, Gloucester. 'Stuart Caine' enlisted at Bath and at the time of his death was an acting sergeant in the 1/4th. Battalion Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry). His regimental number was 200559, but at one time appears as a private, number 2287. He died in Mesopotamia on the 16th.of January 1918. William was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is buried in the Basra War Cemetery, III QII. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 36 Portway.

                        

Harry James Carr was born in Warminster late in 1893, the son of Joseph a plasterer, tiler and church sexton of the Minster church.. His mother was Annie Carr (nee James), and the couple were married in August 1887. His father was the son of Melchisedec and Caroline Carr, both apparently born in Warminster. During 1901 the family were living at 22 Church Street, Warminster, and in 1911 were still there, with Harry working as a plasterer. He enlisted in Warminster and served in the depot battalion of the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, Harry was a private, regimental number 22738. He died of wounds in Graylingswell Hospital, Chichester, Sussex on the 17th. of February 1917, aged 24. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Harry was buried in St. Denys (Minster) churchyard, Warminster. Harry was a first cousin, once removed of Frederick Albert and Ernest Stanley James.

                        

Ernest William Carter was the second son of Ebenezer (1869-1942)and Emily Augusta Carter (1873-1963 nee Riddick). He was born in Zeals, Wiltshire during 1896, and in 1901 his family were living at 9 East Street, Warminster. By 1911 they had moved to 45 Boreham Road, with Ebenezer employed as a foreman smith in an engineering works. Whilst living at Freshford in Somerset, Ernest enlisted into the 8th. Bn. Somerset Light Infantry, number 25532. He was serving as a private when his battalion were attacking 'Greenland Hill', near Fampoux on the 28th. of April 1917, when he was killed. He was buried in the Dept. de Pas de Calais. At the time of his death, his parents were living
at 24 King's Weston Avenue, Shirehampton, Bristol. Both of his parents died in Aldershot, Hampshire.

                        

Ernest Roy Compton was born during 1897 in Warminster, the son of Edward John and Thurza Ann Compton (nee Robbins). In 1901 the family were living at 6 King Street, Warminster, with Edward working as a groom and gardener. Roy firstly joined the Wiltshire Regiment, number 3355, at Trowbridge, and was transferred to the 1/4th. Bn. Hampshire Regiment, number 202004. Whilst serving as a private he died in Mesopotamia on the 23rd. of February 1917. He is commemorated on the Basra (Al Basrah) Memorial, panel 21 7 63. Roy was the younger brother of Sidney - see next entry.

                        

Sidney Herbert Compton was born in Warminster during 1894, and was the son of Edward John, a groom and gardener and Thurza Ann Compton, (nee Robbins). During 1901 the family were living at 6 King Street, Warminster. By 1911 Sidney was boarding at 14 Clyde Street, Risca, Monmouthshire, working as a smith's helper. He enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire and was enrolled as a private, regimental number 17459 into the 6th.Battalion, South Wales Borderers. He entered France in September 1915, and died of wounds on the 28th.of August 1917, in the France/Flanders campaign. Sidney was awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1914-1915 Star. Sidney is buried in the Lijsenhoek Military Cemetery XVIII G 19.

                        

This is possibly George Nelson Cooper, who was born around 1893 in Sutton Veny, the son of George and Mary A.Cooper. He enlisted at Frome, and was enrolled into the West Somerset Yeomanry, number 2190. He was transferred to the 12th. Bn. (Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry, number 37490. He was killed in action on the 27th. of December 1917 at Jerusalem, serving as a private. George had married Elizabeth Amy Blackmore in Frome during September 1916. She was re-married, to William Henry Lindsay in August 1918 and emigrated to Australia in 1920. Elizabeth lived at Park Road, Cabramatta, Sydney, NSW, and died in June 1952.   
n.b. Harold Charles Cooper was born during 1890 in Warminster, the son of Thomas, a bricklayer and Comfort Cooper, both born in Warminster. In 1891 and 1901, the family were living at 24 Bugley, just outside the town. In 1911 his parents were living at 44a Vicarage Street, Warminster. Harold enlisted at Weybridge, Surrey and was enrolled in the 9th.Battalion, East Surrey Regiment. He entered France in August 1915, and at the time of his death was a lance corporal, regimental number 4290. On the 26th.of September 1915 he was killed in action in the France/Flanders campaign. Harold was awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1914-1915 Star. However a George H. Cooper was serving as a 'mechanician' (3000648 PO) aboard HMS Invincible when she was sunk on the 31st. of May 1916, and was drowned. I have no links to Warminster.

                        

Herbert Victor Creed was born in Warminster during 1898, the son of David John, a railway porter and Mary Creed (nee Hodder). His parents were both born in Dorset, and must have moved to Warminster around 1890. During 1891 the family were living at 6 Imber Road, Warminster, but by 1901 were living at 41 Vicarage Road, in the town. At that time, five of the Creed children were living at home, but Victor, an elder sister and younger brother were 'orphans' in the nearby St.Monica's Ladies' High School and Orphanage. By 1911 however he was living with his parents in Vicarage Road again. Victor enlisted at Warminster, first in the Devonshire Regiment, his number 2569, but transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. At the time of his death, he was a private, regimental number 114811. Victor died of his wounds on the 1st.of November 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. It was just ten days before the Armistice was signed. According to the records he only received the Victory medal. There is a memorial to him in the churchyard of St. Denys, Warminster.

                        

Albert Curtis was born in 1896 in Warminster, the son of Sidney, a butcher and Harriet Curtis (nee Ryall). In 1891 and 1901 the family were living at 24-25 King Street, Warminster. In 1911 the family were still there, with Albert working as an under gardener. He enlisted at Chippenham, Wiltshire and was enrolled in the 6th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, his number 204263. He was killed in action aged 21, on the 10th.of April 1918, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Panel 119-120. Albert was awarded the Victory and British War medals. n.b. An Albert Edward Curtis, born in Warminster during 1886 and served in the Royal Regiment of Artillery. He appears to have survived the conflict.

                        

Stanley Curtis was born on the 31st.of October 1899 in Warminster, the sixth son and eleventh child of Rowland and Sarah Ann Curtis (nee Norris). During 1901, the family were living at 9 Marsh Street in the town, with Rowland working as a gardener. By 1911 Harriet had married a Henry Williams and was living at 152 Gelli Road, Rhondda in Glamorgan. Stanley was working as a coal miner. He joined the Royal Navy, number K 47656 (PO) Portsmouth, and died of disease aboard HMS Amphitrite (minelayer) on the 13th.of September 1918. He was serving at the time as a stoker (second class). He is buried in Christchurch, New E 15,Warminster.

                        

Stanley Ashton Curtis was born in Warminster (some records say Yestrad in Glamorgan) during 1897, his father being Henry Maddock, a farm carter of Tredegar, Wales and Emily Curtis from Warminster. The couple were married in 1898 in Warminster. During 1901 Stanley was living with his grandparents, Eli and Mary Jane Curtis at 30 Brook Street, Warminster, while his parents were living in Longbridge Deverill. Stanley enlisted in Warminster, and was enrolled into the 6th.Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, his number 23788. He died of wounds on the 25th.of March 1918, and was buried in St.Pierre Cemetery, Amiens, GR.VIII F5. Stanley was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

William Charles Curtis was born in Warminster around 1892, the son of William and Mary Ann at 22 King Street, Warminster. In 1901 the family were living at 2 Bread Street, with William senior working as a sawyer in a steam saw mill. In 1911 the family were living at 22 King Street with William junior working as a grocer's porter. In September 1916 he joined the Royal Army Service Corps, number M2/221979, being at the time employed as a motor driver. He married Beatrice Amy James at All Saints', Portsea on the 19th. of December 1917. Having served in France, William died of acute septicaemia on the 14th. of November 1919, and was buried in the Cologne South Cemetery, Subfriedhof Zollstock IV F8. His effects were sent to his wife, living at 104 Nelson Road, Landport, Portsmouth. He was awared the Victory and British War medals, but apparently in February 1922 his wife requested permission to dispose of his medals.

                        

Harry Ernest Daniells was born in Norridge, Warminster during June 1880. He was the son of Harry an agricultural labourer from Upton Scudamore and Dorcas Daniells (nee Knee). In 1891 and 1901 the family were living at 6 Bugley, just outside Warminster. However, by then Harry had joined the Royal Navy (PO/290369) and in 1901 was a stoker aboard HMS. Mars at Gibraltar. In 1910 he returned home to marry Amy Haines, born in 1881 and the daughter of William and Mary Haines (nee Robbins) of Warminster. Their daughters Amy and Anne were born between 1913-1915. Harry was a stoker, petty officer aboard HMS. Tipperary when she led the 4th. Destroyer Flotilla in a torpedo attack on the German Main Fleet off Jutland, Denmark on the 1st.of June 1916. Unfortunately, the Tipperary was sunk by the German dreadnought SMS Westfalen, and lost 185 out of her 197 crew. Harry Daniells was amongst the dead, and his body was not recovered. At the time of his death, Amy and her two daughters were living at 36 Brook Street, Warminster. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Ref. 16.

                        

This is believed to be Sidney Thomas Dixon, who enlisted in the 4th. Bn. (Duke of Edinburgh's) Wiltshire Regiment, number 3313. Having become a lance corporal, he was transferred to the 3rd.Bn.Worcestershire Regiment.  He served as a lieutenant in the 12th.Bn.Worcestershire Regiment having entered France in September 1916. Lt. Dixon was killed on the 20th. of November 1917, and was buried in the Fins New British Cemetery, Sore-le-Grand, Somme. He was award the Victory and British war medals. At the time of his death, his residence was 'Fairview', Boreham Road, Warminster. His mother, Mrs Fry of Salisbury later applied for her dead sons medals.

                        

William James Doughty was the son of Charles, a general labourer and Annie Maria Doughty. He was born during April 1880 in Warminster, and by 1891 the family were living at 5 Boreham. In 1901 and 1911 they were living at 62 Pound Street, Warminster. William worked as a maltster's labourer before enlisting at Devizes. He was enrolled into the 7th.Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, his number 12435. He entered France in September 1915, and whilst a corporal in 'A' Company, was killed in action at Salonika, Greece on the 24th.of April 1917, aged 37. In the action the Wiltshires attacked the Grand Couronne and suffered 14 officers and over 300 other ranks killed or wounded. William is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial, which is on the south east slope of Lake Doiran, Salonika. William was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

John Henry Edwards was born in Warminster during 1894, the son of Henry, a general mason and Alice Louisa Edwards (nee Eacott). His parents were married at Christ Church in May 1885. Henry was the son of Francis and Alice the daughter of Frederick Eacott. In 1901 the family were living at 19 & 20 South Street, and in 1911 were still there with Henry employed as a bricklayer. John was at that time living at 4 Mary Street, Treherbert, Glamorgan, working as a colliery hewer. He enlisted at Tonypandy, Glamorgan and was enrolled into the 9th.(Service) Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment, number 14093. He was killed in action on the 4th.of September 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign, whilst serving as a private. Having entered France in July 1915, he was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 13 a. In November 1919 his mother via the Revd. James Stuart applied for her son's 1914-15 Star.

                        

Charles Elloway was born during 1882 in Warminster, the son of Rowland, a tailor and Elizabeth Elloway (nee Holton). In 1891 the family were living at 40 Chapel Street, Warminster and by 1901 had moved to 11 Chapel Street, when Charles was a viceman at an iron foundry. In 1911 a Charles Elloway was living at 37 Kirton Street, Battersea, and was an India Store depot labourer. Five years later he married a Lucy Tomkins in Poplar, Middlesex. At the time, his mother Elizabeth was living at 15 Chapel Street, Warminster. He was enrolled into the 9th.Battalion, Essex Regiment, his number 34897. On the 28th.of April 1917 he was killed in action, whilst serving as a private and aged 36, during the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Felichy British cemetery, I C 28,
5 kilometres east of Arras, and awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

John Ashe Everest was born in Wandsworth, London. During 1911 he was staying at 16-18 Porchester Gardens,London with ninety nine other males. They were all employees of Messrs William Whiteley, 'Universal providers'. John was a seventeen year old apprentice cashier. He enlisted at Sutton Veny, Wiltshire, although at that time he was living in Torquay, Devon. He was enrolled into the 7th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, and entered France in September 1915. At the time of his death he was a private, regimental number 22127. He was killed in action on the 24th.of April 1917 at Salonika, Greece. Pte.Everest was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Tom Everley was born in Bishopstrow, near Warminster in 1894. He was the son of Thomas Joseph, a thatcher born in Artramont, Co.Wexford, Ireland and Elizabeth Ann Everley (nee Carpenter). Tom's grandfather was Robert Everley and Sarah Barter, both born in Sutton Veny. In 1900, Tom's father died at Wilton, Wiltshire and his mother married William Eacott in Warminster during 1904. In 1911 they were living at 1 Marsh Street, Warminster, with Tom working as a iron works driller. Tom enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1st. Battalion, Coldstream Guards. At the time of his death he was a private, regimental number 14395 and was aged 22. He was killed in action on the 1st.of May 1916, and buried in the White House cemetery, I F 14, St.Jean-de-Ypres. At the time, his mother was living at 24 Marsh Street, Warminster. Tom was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Tom Farley was born in Warminster during 1889, the second son of Albert, a blacksmith and Sarah Jane Farley (nee Spicer). In 1891 the family were living at 3 South Street, Warminster, and by 1901 were at 27 Fore Street, Tom being employed as a yardboy. By 1911 he had joined the Army and was serving in South Africa as a signaller in the 1st. Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. That battalion entered France in August 1914. At the time of his death, Tom was a private in 'A' Company, regimental number 6725. He was killed in action on the 23rd. of August 1916, during the attacks on the Leipzig Redoubt near Thiepval. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier & Face 13 a, near the Bapaume to Albert road in the Somme region of France. Tom was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star. In 1916, his family were still living at 27 Fore Street.

n.b. Although he is not on the Warminster War Memorial, Sidney Herbert Farley was born in Titherington near Warminster during 1888. He was the son of Fred and Sarah (nee Fear). By 1891 the family had moved to Monmouthshire, and in 1911 Sidney was working as a miner. He married Sarah Ann Morris in 1908 and had three children. Sidney enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire He died of wounds on the 3rd.of November 1918 in France. At the time, he was an acting corporal, regimental number 39489 in the 10th.Battalion, South Wales Borderers.

                        

William John Franklin was born during 1877 in Warminster, the eldest son of William, a bricklayer and Elizabeth Franklin (nee Carpenter). In 1891 the family were residing at 68 Pound Street, Warminster, and by 1901 had moved to 41a West Street in that town. Around 1904 he married a Minnie.....and by 1911 William they had a two year old son, also called William. They were living at 78 Pound Street, with William working as a bricklayer. He enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. At the time of his death, William was a private, regimental number 27079. He was killed in action on the 31st.of July 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. I have no record of any medals being awarded to this man. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres, Panel 21.

                        

Harold Christopher Gaisford was born in Warminster during 1899, the son of Joseph, a master carpenter and Rose Anne (nee Gimber). In 1889 they had married in Canterbury, Kent and by 1891 were living at 39 George Street, Warminster. Rose died in 1899 and Joseph moved to Surrey. Later that year, he married Emily Perrins Parker, but he died during 1910. In 1911 Harold, a carpenter was living with his step-mother in Frensham, Surrey. He enlisted at Guildford and joined the Royal Engineers. Whilst serving as a sapper in the 130th. Field Company, regimental number 65029 he was killed in action on the10th.of April 1918 in Belgium. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Panel 1.
His will, proved in January 1919 left £80.9.8 to his sister Miss Hilda Rose Gaisford. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals and the 1914-15 Star.

                        

An Albert Isaac Garrett was born in Warminster during 1883, and he was the eldest son of William, a general labourer and Emily Garrett. In 1891 the family lived at 16 Pound Street, Warminster, and by 1901 had moved to 43 Pound Street, with Albert working as a general labourer. On the 1st.of November 1914 he was killed in action aboard HMS Good Hope. He was a gunner in the Royal Marine Artillery, regimental number RMA/9742. His body was not recovered.
He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Ref 5.

                        

Levi Erasmus Garrett wad born during March 1894 in Warminster. He was the son of Joseph, a general labourer and Sarah Ann Daniels (nee Hinton). In 1891 the family lived at 4 Bugley, outside the town, but by 1901 had moved to 1 Folly Lane, Warminster. His father died in 1903 and by 1911 the family had moved to 9 Folly Lane, Victoria Road, with Levi working as a farm labourer. In 1914, he married Lilian Prince, and during the war she lived at 13 Victoria Road, Bugley. He enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 2/4th.(T.F.) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, he was a private, regimental number 1706. He was killed in action during the Mesopotamia campaign, on the 22nd.of October 1915. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Panels 26 & 63.  
I have no information regarding any medals that were awarded to Levi. Lilian and Levi had a son Joseph, who was born in Warminster between July and September 1914.

                        

Harry Jones was born on the 13th.of December 1891, the son of William and Margaret Jones. During 1901, the family were living at 12 King Street, Warminster, William being a general labourer. Harry joined the Royal Marines Light Infantry, number PO/16210 (Portsmouth). He was killed on the 5th.of June 1916, whilst serving aboard HMS Hampshire (cruiser). That ship hit a mine off the Orkneys on that date, and amongst those killed was Lord Kitchener. Harry's body was not recovered for burial. At the time of his death, his mother was living at 49 Brook Street, Warminster.
He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial 22.

                        

Percy Douglas Garrett was born at Kingston Deverill, Wiltshire in 1894. He was the eldest son of Harry Abraham and Catherine Elizabeth Garrett (nee Brice). His father was a gamekeeper, born in Hornsingham, and his mother was born in Taunton, Somerset. During 1901 the family were living at 51 Higher End, Kingston Deverill, and were still there in 1911. Percy enlisted at Bradford-on-Avon, and was enrolled into the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, regimental number 1390. He was transferred into the 1/4th.(T.F.) Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 203611. Whilst serving as a private, Percy died in Egypt on the 20th.of September 1918. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He was buried in the Cairo War Cemetery Gr. 0 245.

                        

William Garrett was born during 1880 in Warminster, the fourth Henry and Mary Garrett. In 1881 his father was a groom and the family lived at 80 Portway, Warminster. By 1901, his father was a baker and they were living at 14 Portway, with William working as a printer. On the 5th.of August 1905 William married Kate Lucy Macey, daughter of Isaac, at Bishopstrow. In 1915 he enlisted at Trowbridge, Wiltshire and was then aged 37, and a foreman compositor living at 17 Deverill Road, Warminster. He was employed in the Somerset Standard and Warminster Journal office. 
William was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps as a driver and regimental number M/399553. He died of natural causes, following a route march, at the Motor Transport Depot in Sydenham, Kent on the 21st.of May 1918. At the time, his mother Mary was living at 57 Vicarage Road, Warminster. He left a wife and five children, and was buried in the Christ Church churchyard Re: E 9. William does not appear to have been awarded any medals, as he did not serve abroad.

                        

Albert Victor Greenland was born in Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire during 1899. He was the third son of William Alfred and Keziah Greenland (nee Barnes). William's first wife, Mary.... died at Westbury in 1893, aged 31, and William married again in 1894. During 1891 William and Mary were living in Westbury, where William was a postman. In 1910, William and Keziah were living at Regford House, Upton Scudamore, and he was an agricultural labourer. Albert was living in Warminster when he enlisted, and he was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, Albert was a sergeant, regimental number 18849. He died of wounds on the 23rd.of October 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. Albert was buried in Awoingt British cemetery, Gr. 1.B21. According to his obituary in the Warminster Journal, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal, however the records show that he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Alfred John Hall was born during 1897 at Boreham, Warminster, the eldest son of Alfred W. and Minnie M. Hall, both born in Warminster. Alfred senior was the second son of John and Sarah Whittock Hall (nee Harris). During 1881 that family lived at 4 High Street, Warminster, John being an ironmonger and nailmaker, employing 9 men and 2 boys. He was born in Chesterfield, Derbyshire and had married Sarah in her home town of Warminster during 1864. By 1901, Alfred an ironmonger's clerk, and Minnie were living at 31 North Row, Warminster. Alfred junior enlisted at Trowbridge, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 1/4th.(T.F.) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, Alfred was a private, regimental number 200645. He was killed in action in Egypt on the 13th.of November 1917. Alfred was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He was buried in the Ramleh War Cemetery P 12. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 'Winfrid Lodge', Church Street, Warminster.

                        

Hector Thomas Stewart Hicks was born at Parkstone, Dorset during 1893. He was the son of Thomas Hicks and Ann Blackman who were married at Poole, Dorset in 1891. In 1901, Hector was living with his grandmother Arabella Watts (nee Barker), and her husband George, a farmer at Branksome in Dorset. Arabella had married firstly Benjamin Blackman, but after he died in September1895, she married George Watts early in 1896 at Poole. By 1911 Hector was living with his parents at 33 High Street, Warminster, and he was working as a baker and confectioner. During the summer of 1914, Hector married.......Fleet at Totnes, Devon. At the time he enlisted, Hector was living in Warminster, and joined firstly the Royal Army Service Corps, number S/4/215802. He was transferred to the 2/2nd.(London) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), regimental number 67389. Whilst serving as a private, Hector was killed in action on the 21st.of March 1918 at Fargnier, on the St.Quentin front in France / Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Hector is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Panel 19-21.

                        

I have no information regarding any Army or Royal Navy 'dead' that fit H.Hill.
* in 1895 a Herbert Hill was born in Hornsingham, Wiltshire , but I have no details of any Army career.
** In 1911 a Herbert Hill aged 16, at 55 West Street, Warminster. a general labourer was living with his parents George and Fanny Hill *** A Herbert Edward Hill was in the 6th.Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment and was killed in July 1916, but he was apparently born in Hoxton, London and enlisted in Essex.

                        

Oswald Edward Hiscock was born in Kington Magna, Dorset during 1896, the son of Henry George, a farmer and Ellen Hiscock. In 1901 the family were living at Knowle Rock Farm, Shepton Montague, Somerset. During 1911 the family were living at Boreham Dairy, Warminster. Oswald was working as a grocer's apprentice. He enlisted at Winchester, Hampshire whilst living at Boreham, Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1/4th.(T.F.) Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. He was serving as a private, regimental number 201297 when he died on the 21st.of February 1916 in Mesopotamia. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals and the 1914-1915 Star.
Oswald is commemorated on the Basra Memorial Panel 21 & 63.

                        

Frank Hobbs was born in Warminster during 1886, the son of Henry and Fanny Hobbs (nee Doughty). During 1891 the family lived at 29 Fore Street, Warminster, Frank's father being an agricultural labourer. By 1901 they had moved to 23 King Street in the town. In 1911 Frank a collier was living with his mother at 23 King Street, Warminster. Frank enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire, probably having gone to south Wales as a miner, and was enrolled into the 5th. Battalion South Wales Borderers. At the time of his death, he was a private, regimental number 14844. He drowned on the 5th.of August 1915, and was buried in the Merville Communal Cemetery, III Q B, 20 kilometres south west of Armentieres, France. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Edward Charles Hoddinott was born in Warminster during 1888, the eldest son of Edward Charles and Maud Mary Hoddinott (nee Sawyer). In 1891 the family were living at 20 Mill Lane, Warminster, with Edward senior working as an agricultural labourer. By 1901 the family had moved to 20 Boreham outside the town, and in 1911 were at 16 Norton Bavant. Edward enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 2/4th. Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private, regimental number 202431. He died in India on the 7th.of June 1918 and was buried in the Lebong Cantonment Cemetery. Edward was awarded the British War medal. At the time of his death, his parents were living at Church Street, Silton, Zeals, Wiltshire.

                        

Albert Louis Holton was born in Warminster during 1897 and was the fifth son of Thomas and Hannah Holton. During 1901 his father was a pork butcher at 29 Pound Street, Warminster, and by 1911 the family had moved to 4 Obelisk Terrace, Silver Street. Albert enlisted in that town and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 22318. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private in the 101 Company, Machine Gun Corps , regimental number 13583. He was killed in action on the 1st.of August 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. Albert was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier & Face 5c & 12 c.

                        

William Tom Holton was born in Upton Lovell, Wiltshire during 1897, and was the eldest son of Tom and Eliza Holton. During 1901 the family was living at 3 Cock's Yard, Warminster, and William's father was working as a maltster's labourer. Eliza died in 1908 and in 1910 his father married Leila W.Carrpacquay, who was born in Madrid of Italian parents. In 1911 the family were living at 13 Chapel Street. William seems to have been a caddy at West Wiltshire Golf Club. He enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 9968. He was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps, regimental number 18060, and at the time of his death, was serving as a private. He died of wounds on the 30th.of March 1918, in the France/Flanders campaign. William was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. He was buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery XXXIII B 23 A, France. At the time of William's death his father was living at 29 Bread Street, Warminster.
n.b. Another William Thomas Holton was born in Devizes, and was enlisted there in the 1st.Bn. Wiltshire Regiment, number 6904. He was killed in action on the 24th. of October 1914, and buried in the Dept. de Pas-de-Calais.

                        

Francis George Howell was born during 1899 at Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire, the eldest son of Francis G., a painter on an estate and Ellen Howell. During 1901 the family were living at 38 Church Street, Maiden Bradley, with Francis working as a rural postman. At the time of his enlistment at Warminster, Francis junior was living in Bath, Somerset. He joined the Royal Field Artillery, regimental number 212678 as a gunner. He died of wounds on the 29th.of April 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. Francis was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He was buried in the Lissenthoek Military cemetery, XXVIII E 1A.

                        

Although possibly not the F.Howell on Warminster War Memorial, Frederick Howell was born on the 8th.of May 1898 at Norton Bavant, the son of Sidney and Emma Howell of Sutton Veny. In 1911 he was an ordinary seaman aboard HMS Argyll at Gibraltar, having joined the Royal Navy, number J.7380 (Dev) Devonport,. He was killed on the 31st.of May 1916 as an able-bodied seaman aboard HMS Defence (cruiser) which was sunk at the battle of Jutland on that day. At the time of his death, his mother was living in Upton Scudamore. His body was not recovered for burial..

                        

Albert Hudd was born in Warminster during 1884, the third son of George and Mercy Hudd (nee Price). In 1891 the family were living at 31 Brook Street, Warminster, George being a railway shunter. By 1901, they had moved to 21 Marsh Street in the town, and in 1911 were living at 5 Marsh Street. Albert was an Army reservist and working as a blacksmith's labourer. He married Bessie Victoria, daughter of Job and Jane Humphries (nee Sly) in 1912. Albert enlisted at Devizes, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment. At the time of his death he was serving as a private, regimental number 6800. Whilst the battalion was resting at Westoutre, Belgium, Albert died of his wounds on the 25th.of November 1914. He is commemorated on the Main Gate of the Ypres Memorial, and was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star. At the time of his death, Bessie was living at 8 Brook Street. 

                        

William Humphries was born during 1900 in Warminster, the eldest son of Frank, a nurserymans' labourer, and Ellen Louise Humphries. During 1901 the family were living at 1 Cuckoo's Nest, Pickford's Lane, West Street, Warminster. By 1911 they had moved to 3 Sambourne Road in the town. William enlisted at Trowbridge, Wiltshire into the 1st.Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, and at the time of his death, was serving as a private, regimental number 31220. He was killed in action, aged 21 on the 24th.of October 1918. He was buried in the south side of Monchaux Communal Cemetery, 12 kilometres south west of Valenciennes, France. At that time his parents were living at 8 Pound Street, Warminster. William was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

William Cosmore Hunt was born in Barnsbury, Middlesex in 1878 of Edward and Edith Maria Hunt (nee Burley). During 1901 he was serving in the 4th. Bn. Middlesex Regiment at the Tower of London. In December 1901 he married Elizabeth Emily Searle (1878-1960) in Camberwell, Middlesex, his occupation being a shirt cutter. In 1911 they were living at 8 Silver Street, Warminster with two daughters and a son. William was still employed as a shirt cutter, and was also a lieutenant in the town's Fire Brigade. He enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 3rd. Grenadier Guards, number 28882. William was killed in action at Fontaine Notre Dame, Cambrai, on the 27th. of November 1917. He is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial, Louveral, Panel 2. 
n.b During 1901, a family called Hunt were living at 12 Silver Street, Warminster, with a son William H. Hunt aged 9.

                        

Alfred John James was born during October 1891 in Warminster. He was the second son of Alfred (1864-1904) and Mary Louisa James (nee Punter 1863-1955). In 1901 the family were living at 10 Cold Harbour, Warminster, with Alfred senior employed as a gas fitter. By 1911 they had moved to 10 Bath Road, Alfred senior having died. Alfred junior worked at Cordens in the town, and enlisted at Warminster and joined the 12th.Bn. (Princess Louise's) Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, number S/18384. He was killed in action on the 9th. of May 1917 at Thesprotia, Iperios, Saloniki, Greece, and was buried at Kilkis, Central Macedonia. He is commemorated on the Doiran Memorial. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.
Alfred John was related to Harry James Carr, Frederick Albert James and Ernest Stanley James.

                        

Ernest Stanley James was born during June 1896 in Warminster, the second son of Albert Case James and Anna Sophia (nee Daniels). During 1901, the family were living at 72 Portway, Warminster with Albert working as a carpenter. In 1911 the family had moved to 60 Portway with 'Stanley' employed as a plumber. Ernest enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 1/4th.Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He was killed in action by shell fire from the Turkish army near Fryer Hill on the 7th.of November 1917, during the third battle of Gaza in the Egyptian campaign. He was a time serving as a private, regimental number 200308. He was buried in Gaza War Cemetery XIII C 2. Ernest was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death his parents were living on the Boreham Road.
n.b. His older brother Frederick Albert enlisted in January1917 at Devizes and joined the 18th.Bn. Hampshire Regiment at Colchester, Essex. At the time, he was living with his parents at 11 Boreham Road, employed as a compositor.He was transferred to the 1st.Bn. Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, stationed at Cork in Ireland. After the war he served with the 89th. Labour Corps in Italy, before being de-mobbed in 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, and he died in March 1974.

                        

Howard Edwin (or Edward) Harry James was born during August 1889 at Warminster, the son of Harry (1852-1939) and Annie James (1850-1922, nee Turner). He was related to Frederick Albert and Ernest Stanley James. 
In 1891 the family were living at 39 Boreham Road, with Harry working as a corn agent for Messrs. Scott and Smith. By 1901 the family had moved to 13 The Furlong, Warminster, with Harry still employed as a corn agent. Howard joined the army in April 1909 at Devizes, aged 19, and was enrolled into the 4th.Bn. Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He requested to join the 1st.Royal Dragoons, which was granted in April 1909, and served as a trooper, number D/3224. During 1911 the regiment was in the Punjab, India, and in 1914 in South Africa. The regiment was sent to Belgium in October 1914, and served in all the major engagements. Howard married Emily Cornelia Stivey (born in Co.Tipperary, Ireland in 1887) during November 1915 at Hunslet Moor, Leeds in Yorkshire, and they had two daughters. Before 1911, his parents had moved from East Street, Warminster to Green Road, to Poole in Dorset. After the war, Howard worked as a trolley driver. During November 1919, he was involved in an accident, and died a result on the 20th. of January 1920. He had a gun-carriage funeral, and was buried in St. Mary's, Longfleet, Dorset A 14 2. Emily died in Poole during 1969, and their elder daughter, Loma born in February 1918, was still living in Poole in 2013. Howard was awarded the Victory and British War medals, together with the 1914 Star.
n.b. His elder brother was Algernon Willie Choate James. Before the war he had moved to Australia, and enlisted in the Australian Expeditionary Force that captured New Guinea. He moved to Fiji and joined the second contingent for overseas service. In England he joined the Royal Engineers and was sent to France. There he lost an arm and was twice decorated, receiving the Military Medal and Bar.  After the war he returned to Fiji and joined the Customs Service. Having been awarded the M.B.E., he retired as a senior customs officer in 1946 and died in Suva, Fiji during 1953.

                        

Alec John Kill was born during 1891 in Warminster the son of Arthur and Sarah Kill (nee Ransome). During 1901, the family were living at 2 Boreham Cottages, Warminster, Arthur being a domestic gardener. By 1911 Alec was living with his mother at 59 Vicarage Street, and he was employed as a clerk at a motor works. At the time Alec enlisted in Warminster, he was living in Sutton Veny, Wiltshire. He was enrolled into the 1/4th. Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, and at the time of his death was serving as a corporal, regimental number 1071. Alec was killed in action during the Mesopotamia campaign, on the 22nd.of November 1915. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Panel 30 & 34. Alec was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Edward John Knee was born in Warminster in 1892 the son of Henry a builder's labourer and Mary Jane. In 1901 the family were living at 8 Pound Street, Warminster, and in 1911 he was living with his father at 11 Bleek's Buildings in West Street. He was called up in October 1916 and reported to Devizes, where he joined the Worcestershire Regiment, regimental number 37516. In July 1917 he was transferred to the 1st.Garrison Battalion, Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire) Regiment. He died of leukemia whilst serving as a lance corporal, regimental number 51166 at Malta on the 31st. of October 1917. Edward was buried in the Pieta Military Cemetery C XVI 3. He was awarded the British War medal. His mother died on the 5th. of November 1917, aged 63 and living at 71 West Street, Warminster.

                        

Hugh Dav(e)y Labrum was born during 1895 in Shaftesbury, Dorset the fifth son of Richard Newman and Frances Mary Labrum (nee Davey). During 1901 Hugh's father, a wine merchant's manager, 4 sons and 2 daughters were living at 4 Weymouth Street, Warminster. Hugh's mother and 1 son were living at Victoria House, Victoria Street, Shaftesbury. By 1911, the family had moved to 'Melrose', 5 High Street in Warminster, with Hugh working as an ironmonger's apprentice. He enlisted at Warminster, and at the time of his death was a private, regimental number 200220 in the 1/4th. Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He died on the 24th.of May 1917 during the Mesopotamia campaign, and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Panels 30 & 34. Hugh was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

John Lewer was born in Frome, Somerset (or Horningsham, Wiltshire) during 1890, the third son of William Henry and Sarah Ann Lewer. During 1901 the family lived at Forest Cottage, West Woodland, Selwood, Frome, with William working as a gamekeeper. John married Beatrice Annie May Grist in November 1909 at St.Denys' church, Warminster. Their son William John was born during early 1911, and John followed in early 1912. Whilst living at Warminster, John enlisted at Taunton, Somerset and was enrolled into the 8th. Battalion, Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry). Whilst serving as a lance corporal, regimental number 14755 he was killed in action on the 1st.of July 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. John was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial, Pier 2 A.
n.b. His younger brother, Edwin Thomas Lewer's name is on the Horningsham memorial.

                        

Edward George Maidment was born during 1887 in Warminster, the third son of Mark and Lily Louisa Maidment. In 1891 the family lived at 31 Pound Street, Warminster, Mark being a brewer's labourer. By 1901 the family had moved to 39 Pound Street, with Edward working as an errand boy. In October 1906, Edward married Florence Annie Barnett, and early in 1909 Edward William was born. He was followed in June 1910 by Herbert Frederick, and in 1911 by Dorothy A. During 1911, Edward senior and family were living at 53 Pound Street with Edward working as a groom. His parents were still at number 39. Edward enlisted at Devizes, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 5th. Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte's Own). Whilst serving as a lance corporal, regimental number 5193, he was killed in action on the 30th.of October 1914 in the France/Flanders campaign.
His name is commemorated on the Menin Gate, Ypres, Panel 5.
Edward was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star.

                        

William Henry Mead was born in Frome during 1887, the son of Henry, a bricklayer and Eliza Mead (nee Hatter). He joined the 2nd. Bn. Wiltshire Regiment, number 6239 and served as a private in France. He died in Tidworth Hospital on the 27th. of April 1919, and was buried in Christ Church, churchyard in Warminster, New part 6. William was awarded the Victory and British War medals together with the 1914 Star.  
n.b. A Walter John Mead was born in Westbury, Wiltshire during 1883, the son of James, a labourer in a brickyard and Elizabeth Mead (nee Millard). In 1901 the family were living at 'Chalford', Westbury, and were still there in 1911, with Walter working as a labourer to a glove manufacturer. He enlisted at Warminster and joined the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, regimental number 1218. He later transferred to the Royal Wiltshire Hussars, regimental number 320399. Whilst serving as a private he was killed in action on the 19th.of May 1917, having entered France on the 3rd.of December 1915. Walter was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Donald Mather Mees was born during 1900 at Mells, Somerset, the son of Arthur Henry, a journeyman baker and Mary Mees (nee Mather), who was born in Roxburgh, Scotland. In 1911 the family were living at 17 East Street, Warminster, with Arthur working as a grocer and wine merchant. At the time of his enlistment, in Devizes, Donald was living in Warminster and was enrolled into the 4th.(T.F.) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 48273, he died in Dublin, Ireland on the 15th.of August 1918. Donald was buried in Mells Churchyard 31.6. The probate of his will was signed at Salisbury, Wiltshire in November 1919 willing all of Donald's effects to his father, Arthur Henry Mees, grocer. Donald's estate was valued at £2,384 15s, and at that time his address was listed as 17 East Street, Warminster. Donald was not awarded any medals, having never served in a foreign theatre of war.

                        

Horace John Mitchelmore was born in Modbury, Devon during 1882, the son of John Crocker (1854-1907), a draper and boot maker and Virtue Mitchelmore (1853-1939 nee Pady). In 1901, Horace was attending Kingsbridge Grammar School in Devon, where he was a boarder. During 1911 John was boarding at 12 Harrison Road, East Dorking, Surrey, working as a domestic gardener. In 1913 he married Lily Cruse (born in 1887 at Wookey, Somerset) in Warminster, and enlisted there. He was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 10043, he was killed in action on the 28th.of July 1915 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the St.Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richeberg l'Avoue I H4. Horace left his wife and a son, Horace Charles Vernon. He was born in Warminster during March 1915 and died in Cheltenham in July 1965. His mother never re-married, and died in the New Forest district in 1950. I have no record of any medals that Horace senior would have been entitled to.

                        

Stanley Moore was born in Warminster around 1892, the son of William Thomas and Julia Moore (nee Sparey). In 1911 he was living at 11 Brook Street, Warminster, employed as a grocers' porter. He enlisted into the Somerset Light Infantry, number 21957, but was transferred to the 5th.Bn. Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment), number 24201. He was killed in action, whilst serving as a private on the 9th. of August 1916, and was buried in the Dept. de la Somme. Picardie. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Panel & Face 11 D.   

                        

I have no details of this individual being amongst the Army or Royal Navy 'dead'. A Fred Morgan was born during 1873 at Mere, Wiltshire, and his brother Frank in 1877, but I have no connections for them regarding Warminster.

                        

Sidney Harold Naile was born during 1886 in Bath, Somerset, the fourth son of James Robert, a printer's compositor and Mary Ann Naile, both born in Bath. During April 1911, Harold was boarding at Elmwell Cross House, in Warminster, and working as a mail cart driver. At the same address was Henry John Burgess, his wife Eliza and their daughter Lucy Maud. Henry was a postman, and in June 1911 Sidney married Lucy Maud Burgess in Warminster. He enlisted at Bath and was enrolled into the Coldstream Guards. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private, regimental number 5574. He died of wounds on the 19th.of July 1917 during the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Dozinghem Military Cemetery I J.4. Sidney was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star. At the time of his death, his wife was living at 25 Silver Street, Warminster.

                        

Charles Nash was born in Warminster during September 1885, the third son of James Robert, a railway ganger on the G.W.R. and Elizabeth Nash (nee Stanley). During 1901, the family were living at 1 Imber Road, Warminster and Charles was working as an iron moulder. In 1911 he was living in Dunstable, Bedfordshire and working as an iron foundry moulder. He enlisted at Swindon, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the Corps of Royal Engineers. At the time of his death he was serving as a sapper in the 63rd. Field Company, his regimental number being 504580. Charles died of his wounds on the 19th.of October 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Kortrijk (St. Jean) Comm. Cemetery, Belgium Re : A. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 21 Long Ground, Frome.

                        

John Newell was born in Warminster (or Frome) and enlisted at Bath, Somerset into the 2/6th. Battalion (Territorials) Gloucestershire Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 242553, he was killed in action on the 23rd.of August 1917 in the France / Flanders campaign. During 1901, living at 24 Vicarage Street, Warminster were George C.H.Newell 35 a cowman on a farm, and Bessie M. Newell who was born in Warminster. Their sons Herbert J. 6 and George J. 4 were living with them. John was awarded the Victory and British War medals, but they seem to have been returned to the War Office, and then re-claimed by John's brother H.J.Newell in 1926.
John was buried in the New Irish Farm Cemetery, and commemorated on the Spree Farm Memorial 14.

                        

Thomas Allen Noise was born in Salisbury, Wiltshire, and enlisted at Battersea in London. During 1911, the family of a Mr. Noise were living at 56a, Queen's Road, Battersea. They were possibly relations of a family living at 38 Market Place, Warminster in 1911 who were William Henry and Amelia Gerturde Noise, whose son Thomas Allen was 15 and born in Salisbury. He enlisted there and was enrolled into the 13th. Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Thomas entered France on the 30th.of July 1915, and at the time of his death was serving as a sergeant, regimental number 4030. He was killed in action on the 10th.(or 11th.) of April 1917 in Arras and later awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1915 Star. His final resting place is in Monchy-Le-Preaux Military Cemetery, France, Gr.1 B6.

                        

Ewart Frank Norris was the second son of Frank and Maria Norris (nee Eacott), and born during 1898 in Warminster. In 1901 the family were living at 19 Deverill Road, Warminster. Frank was age 30 a mason's labourer, Maria was 30, William was 6, Ewart F. was 3 and Susan Eacott 59 widow, and sister-in-law to Frank, all born in Warminster. During 1911 the family were living at 30 Marsh Road, Warminster with Ewart working as a cowman on a farm. He enlisted in the town and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death he was serving as a private, regimental number 26947. He died, presumably of wounds on the 24th.of October 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Hautmont Comm. Cemetery, IV C. 19. Ewart was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 12, Hillwood, Warminster.

                        

Frederick James Norris was the eldest son of Frederick James and Emily Norris (nee Ferris). During 1891, the family were living at 11 Marsh Street, Warminster, Frederick senior was 30, and a furnace minder. His wife Emily was 24, and their children were, Edith Mary 6, Frederick J. 4 and Herbert J. 1. They were all born in Warminster. By 1901, the family had moved to 32 Marsh Street, and Frederick, aged 14 was a general labourer. In 1911 they were still living at that address, with Frederick working as a trellis maker. He married Phoebe Smith in April 1912, and in 1914 they were living at 31 Marsh Street, he still being a trellis maker. Frederick enlisted in Warminster and joined the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. His battalion entered France on the 14th.of August 1914. He was killed in action in France on the 31st.of October 1914, and at the time of his death was a private, regimental number 6689. Frederick is commemorated on the Le Touret memorial, Panel 33-34, which is on the Bethune to Armentieres road in the Pas-de-Calais region of France. He was awarded Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star.

                        

Reginald William Norris was the fourth son of Frederick James and Emily Norris. He was the younger brother of Frederick (see previous entry).Reginald was born in 1898 in Warminster. He was first enrolled into the Devonshire Regiment with the regimental number 42254. He was transferred to the 6th.Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, and at the time of his death, was a private, regimental number19730. According to 'Ancestry.co.uk', he died of his wounds on the 26th.of July 1916, age 19. Reginald was buried in the St.Nicholas British Cemetery, near Arras in the Pas-de-Calais region of France. However, the 'Find a grave' website says he was buried at St.Nicholas, plot II B 8, with a date given as the 26th. of July 1917. As the cemetery was not started until March 1917, this must be correct. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Charlie Northover was born in Warminster during 1881, the fourth son of Henry and Sarah Northover (nee Horder). His parents were born in Dorset, but must have moved to Warminster around 1866. By 1891 the family were living at 17 West Street, Warminster, with Henry employed as a gardener, and with Sarah caring for seven children at home. By 1901, the family had moved to Swindon where Charlie was a drilling machinist. He enlisted at Stoke-on -Trent, Staffs., and was enrolled into the 7th.Battalion Prince of Wales's, (North Staffordshire) Regiment. He was killed in action on the 9th.of April 1916, age 35 and during the Mesopotamia campaign. At the time, he was a private, regimental number 15834. He is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Panel 34 in Iraq. Having also served in the Balkans campaign he was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 -1915 Star.

                        

Augustus John Parham was born in Bishopstrow near Warminster during 1891. He was the second son of George and Matilda Parham, and during 1901 the family were living at 61 Boreham, Warminster. In 1911 the family were still living there, with Augustus employed as a gardener. He enlisted at Trowbridge, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 1/4th.(Territorial) Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private in C Company, regimental number 201480. He died of his wounds on the 13th.of November 1917 at Mesmijeh, Palestine during the Egyptian campaign. He was buried in the Ramleh War Cemetery. Augustus was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

William Harold Pearce was born during 1895, the second son of Albert George and Sarah Charlotte Pearce. During 1901 the family lived at 35 Pound Street, Warminster and Albert was employed as a maltster's labourer. In 1911 the family were living at 8 Bugley, Victoria Road, Warminster with 'Harold' working as a milk lad. He enlisted on the 14th. of August 1914 at Devizes, Wiltshire and joined the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. However, he was dischraged on the 10th. of October 1914 as 'not being likely to become an efficient soldier.' However, he seems to have rejoined the army, because a Private William Harold Pearce, born in Warminster, of the 1st.Bn.Wiltshire Regiment, number 21482 was killed in action in France on the 23rd. of August 1916. His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Panel & Face 13A. William was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

n.b.Walter Henry Pearce was born on the 7th.of April 1887 in Sutton Veny, the son of Henry and Charlotte Pearce. In 1901, Walter was a servant at a house in Brook Street, Knightsbridge, London. He joined the Royal Navy, number 229312 (PO) Portsmouth. In 1911 he was an able-bodied seaman aboard HMS Prince of Wales off China. He was killed on the 26th.of November 1914, serving as an able-bodied seaman aboard HMS Bulwark (battleship). That ship was blown up by accident opposite Sheerness in the River Medway on the date. There were only 12 survivors out of 750 officers and men. At the time of his death, his mother Charlotte, was living in Coventry Road, Dunchurch near Rugby, Warwickshire.

                        

Oliver George Penny was born in Warminster during 1890, the third son of Frederick and Louisa Penny. During 1891 the family were living at 19 Mill Lane, Warminster with Frederick employed as an agricultural labourer. By 1901 the family had moved to 19 Boreham, near Warminster and by 1911 were living at 52 West Street, with 'George' working as a farm labourer. He enlisted at Devizes, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 4th.Battalion, Special Brigade, Royal Engineers, Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 3/9130. He was transferred to the Corps of Engineers, and at the time of his death was a pioneer, regimental number 130067. He was killed in action on the 27th.of June 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. His name is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Bay 1.George was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914 Star.

                        

Edgar Douglas Perry was born in Fovant, Wiltshire in 1899, the son of Alfred and Sarah Perry nee Burpitt). During 1910 they lived at 'The Nap', Fovant, with Alfred employed as a police constable. By 1911 they had moved to 29 North Row, Warminster. Edgar enlisted at Croydon, Surrey and was enrolled into the Royal North Devon Hussars, regimental number 225801. He was transferred to the 8th.(Service) Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, regimental number 44556. He was serving as a private when he died of his wounds on the 5th.of June 1918, in the France/Flanders campaign.
He was buried in the St.Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen Q11 1 11. 
Edgar was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death, his mother was living at 'Inglethorpe', 70 (now 58) Pound Street, Warminster.

                        

Edwin William Pope was born on the 21st. of November 1884 in Warminster, the second son of Thomas Arthur and Elizabeth Pope. During 1891, the family were living at 37 Boreham Road, Warminster, his father working as an agricultural smith. By 1901, the family had moved to Kelso Cottage, Imber Road, Warminster, and Edwin was a chairmakers' apprentice. He joined the Royal Navy, number 5811 DA. He was killed on the 9th.of February 1916 whilst serving as a deck hand in the Royal Naval Reserve. He was aboard the Persistive (HM drifter). His body was not recovered for burial. At the time of his death, his mother Elizabeth was living at Peverill, Falmouth, Cornwall.

                        

A Frederick H. Pope was born in Warminster during 1889 and was the younger brother of Edwin – see above. Frederick emigated to Canada around 1907, and enlisted in the Canadian Infantry. Whilst serving as a sergeant major, he was killed in action on the 2nd. of March 1917. He was buried in the Maroeuil British Cemetery, III K 15.

                        

Frederick Bertie Price was the third son of Frederick and Sarah Mariah Price (nee Lanham). He was born in Warminster during 1882, and during 1891 the family were living at 27 George Street in the town. By 1901 they had moved to 22 North Row in that town, and Bertie was working as a printer's compositor. During 1911 the family were still there, with Frederick, unmarried working as a printer. He enlisted in Warminster, and was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps, regimental number M/281504. He transferred to the Machine Gun Corps, regimental number 98228, and at the time of his death was serving as a private. He was killed in action on the 12th.of April 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. Frederick is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial Panel 11. Bertie was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He had married Alice L.Carnall in Warminster during 1915, and their son Frederick C. was born in 1916. At the time of his death, his wife and son were living at Vine Cottage, Codford St.Mary.

                        

George Price was the third son of Jesse George and Sarah Ann Price and born in Warminster during 1899. During 1901 the family were living at 89 Pound Street, his father working as a maltster's labourer. George enlisted in the town and was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps, regimental number M/283065. He transferred to the 2nd.Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment, regimental number 21607. George died of his wounds on the 1st.of July 1918 during the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Pernois British Cemetery, Halloy-les-Pernois II C7. George was awarded the Victory and British War medals

                        

Ernest Harold Prince was born in Warminster during 1891, the fourth son of William John and Mary Ann Prince (nee Sutton). During 1891 the family were living at 33 Brook Street, Warminster with William working as a corn store labourer. By 1901 the family were still living there, but William was a roofer in a colliery in Monmouth, Wales. Ernest seems to have followed his father there, as he enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire. He was enrolled into the Royal Horse Artillery as a gunner, regimental number 28953. He died on the 29th.of October 1918 in England, and was buried in Christ Church churchyard, Warminster, New E. 17. Ernest was awarded the Victory and British War medals, so he must have served abroad.
n.b. Walter Wallace Prince was a younger brother of Ernest, and was born in Warminster during 1893. In 1911 he was living with another brother, William Henry at Abercarn, Monmouthshire, employed as a colliery labourer. He enlisted at Devizes, and was enrolled into the 2nd.Bn. Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, number 9498.Walter was killed in action on the 26th. of September 1915 in France. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals together with the 1914-1915 Star.

                        

George Prince was the third son of Oliver and Martha Prince, and was born in Warminster during 1899. Between 1891 and 1901 the family lived at 24 Marsh Street, Warminster, George's father being a saw mill labourer. In 1911 they were at 25a Marsh Street with Oliver employed as a tree feller. Having enlisted in the town, George was enrolled into the 2/4th. Battalion, Oxford and Bucks. Light Infantry. George was only 19 at the time of his death, and he was killed in action on the 2nd.of November 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. It was only nine days before the end of hostilities. He was serving as a private, regimental number 34446. He was buried in the Presau Communal Cemetery Extension E 34, which is about 6 kilometres south east of Valenciennes, France. George was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Henry Francis Rendell was born in Limington (near Yeovil), Somerset during 1890. He was the eldest son of Frank and Mary G. Rendell, his father being a market gardener and dealer. Henry married Edith Harriet Lapham in Yeovil during 1910, and after that the Rendell's seem to have moved to Warminster. In 1911 the couple were living at 8 Bishopstrow, Warminster with Henry employed looking after horses on a farm. They had a daughter Laura May born at Chilthorne Dormer in Somerset during 1910 and two sons, Francis J. born in 1912 and Henry J. in 1915, both in Warminster. Henry enlisted in Woolwich near London, and was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps, regimental number T/4/263582. He transferred to the 26th.Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), regimental number GS/66290. At the time of his death he was serving as a private, and was killed in action on the 30th.of March 1918, in the France/Flanders campaign. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Bay 3.

                        

John Rose born in Corsley, Wiltshire in January 1898, the son of Thomas and Louisa Ann Rose. In 1911 the family were living in Whaddon Lane, Hilperton, with Thomas employed as a gardener John joined the Royal Navy as a Boy 1st.Class, and died at Haslar Hospital, Portsmouth on the 11th.of September 1914. At the time his Navy number was J26452, and he was serving aboard HMS Victory. His mother Louisa was then living at 28 Boreham, Warminster.

                        

William Kenneth Sanderson was born in Warminster during 1898, the eldest son of Sidney and Emily Maria Sanderson (nee Atkins). During 1891 William's father, born in the City Road, London was boarding at16 High Street, Warminster and working as a brewer. His parents married in 1893 and moved into 22 Silver Street in the town. William was educated at Lord Weymouth's School in Warminster, He enlisted at Frome, and was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps, regimental number M/283068. He transferred to the 6th.Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment, regimental number 47837.Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 22nd.of March 1918, during the France/Flanders campaign. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Panel 54-56.William was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Reginald Charles Scott was born in Pewsey, Wiltshire around April 1895, and was the son of Walter Thomas, a police superintendant and Mary Ann Scott (nee Tilley). The family seem to have moved to Warminster between 1911 and 1914. Reginald joined the Royal Navy, number J/11273 and at the time of his death was an able seaman. He was killed on the 26th. of November 1914, aged 20, when HMS Bulwark exploded at her moorings off Sheerness. It is thought that cordite charges overheated. Out of a crew of 736, only 14 survived. At the time of his death, Reginald's parents were livingat 'Sleaford', 65 Penn Hill Avenue, Parkstone, Dorset. Reginald is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial Index No. MR3.

                        

Thomas Self was born in Lacock, Wiltshire during 1882, the eldest son of Thomas and Ellen Self. Thomas junior married Annie Miles Till, daughter of Lorenzo, in Warminster on the 19th.of August 1907. Their children were Vera born in 1907, Hilda born in 1908, Arthur T.L. born in 1912 and Celia K. born in 1914. Thomas enlisted at Devizes, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 5575. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private and was killed in action on the 29th.of September (or October) 1914 in France. Aged 33, he was the husband of Annie Self, living at 7 & 8 Victoria Road, Warminster. Thomas is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial, Panel 33-34, near Armentieres in the Pas-de-Calais region of France. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals together with the 1914 Star.

                        

Herbert Rowland Sims, the third son of Edward and Mary Sims (nee Savage) was born in Warminster during 1895. His father was a railway signalman, and during 1901 the family were living at The Aviary, Camberley House, Imber Road, Warminster. In 1911 they were living at 29 Imber Road, with Herbert employed as a tailor's apprentice. He enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 1932. He was transferred to the 1/4th.Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment, regimental number 203024. At the time of his death he was serving as a lance corporal and died, I believe at Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire on the 16th.of October 1918. He was interred in the Minster churchyard, Warminster. As he was awarded the Victory and British War medals, he must have served abroad at some stage.

                        

William George Smith was born in Warminster during 1896, the first son of William George and Sarah Jane Smith. During 1901 the family were living at 19 Hillwood Lane, Warminster with William senior working as a coal merchant's carter. By 1911 the family had moved 10 Brook Street in the town. William junior enlisted in Warminster and joined the 1/4th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He died of his wounds on the 14th.of November 1917 during the Egyptian campaign, and was serving as a private, regimental number 200512. William was buried in the Gaza War Cemetery XIII C 16. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 12 Upper Bread Street, Warminster.

                        

I believe this is William Charles Strong who was a was captain and quartermaster of the 4th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's Wiltshire (Territorial). He died on the 26th.of July 1918, and was buried in the Allahabad New Cantonment Cemetery, India. In 1891, a William Charles Strong is listed a the eldest son of Robert and Louisa Strong of 12 Portway, Warminster. He was born in 1872 and at age 19 was a land agent and clerk. By his will, proved in London on the 19 th. of February 1919, William Charles Strong left his effects to George Thomas Chinn, butcher of Warminster.  

n.b. A Charles Strong of the Royal Army Service Corps is listed as having been born in Warminster. He is listed as having lived at Felixstowe, Suffolk at the time of his enlistment at Ipswich. He died in England on the 12th.of February 1918, as a driver, regimental number T/313413. A Charles H. Strong was born in Warminster during 1899, and listed as a grandson of Robert and Louisa Strong of 12 Portway, Warminster in 1901.

                        

Thomas Henry Stubbs was the second son of Henry S. and Lavinia Harriet Stubbs (nee Rutley). He was born in Warminster during 1898, and in 1901 the family were living at 1 Emwell Street, Warminster, his father who died the following year, being a groom. In 1911 Lavinia, Thomas and two daughters were still at 1 Elmwell Street, with a lodger Ernest Ingram. Lavinia married him in December 1919. Thomas enlisted at Frome, Somerset and was enrolled into the Royal Army Medical Corps. In November he was serving with the 101st.Field Ambulance when they entered France. At the time of his death, he was serving as a private, regimental number 66296. He was killed in action on the 22nd.of April 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign, and buried in the St.Leger British Cemetery E. 12. Thomas was awarded the Victory and British War medals, together with the 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Harrold Frederick Symes was the eldest son of Frederick William and Annie Symes, and was born in Warminster during 1895. During 1901 the family were living at 3 Park Lodges, Boreham, just outside the town, with his father employed as a carpenter. In 1911 the family were still there with Harold employed as a draughtsman for an engineer. He enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 1/ 4th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. At the time of his death, he was serving as a lance corporal, regimental number 200221. He died of his wounds on the 5th.of June 1916, age 21 during the Mesopotamia campaign. Harold was buried in the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, XXI W3, and noted as being the son of Annie and the late Frederick Symes of 49 Boreham.

                        

This is George Albert Sidney Tancock who was the eldest son of George Henry and Florence May Tancock, and was born in Bath, Somerset during 1894. During 1901 the family were living at 126 Cock Road, Hornsingham near Warminster. They were still there in 1911, with Sidney working as a farm labourer. He enlisted at Bath and joined the North Somerset Yeomanry, regimental number 1031. He was transferred to the 1st.Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, and at the time of his death was serving as a private, regimental number 206367. He was killed in action on the 26th.of October 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign, and buried in the Hooge Crater Cemetery, VII E.11, Ypres. 'Sidney' was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is also commemorated on the Hornsingham War Memorial. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 62 Vicarage Street, Warminster.

                        

William Francis Taylor was born in Warminster during 1894, the son of Elizah Jane Tabor (!), and in 1901 was living at 15 King Street, Warminster. During 1911 his mother and sisters were living at 16 Pound Street. William married Alice Mary Durnford in St. Denys Church, Warminster in 1913. He enlisted in the town and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 22384. He was transferred to the 1/8th.(T.F.) Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, regimental number 331401. He was killed in action on the 19th.of April 1917, during the Palestine campaign, whilst serving as a lance corporal. William is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial, Panel 28-29. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. In 1917 his wife was living at 43 Portway, Warminster.

                        

I believe this to be William Taylor, who died on the 12th. of September 1917, whilst serving as a petty officer aboard HMS Suvla. He is commemorated on the Suez War Memorial, B45, Egypt. I have no information regarding any connection with Warminster.

                        

I understand this to be a Frank Thompson, but similarly I have no information regarding this individual, or any connection with Warminster.

                        

Joseph Albert John Tisseman was the eldest son of William James and Mary Tisseman (nee Smith), and was born in Bath, Somerset in January 1885. By 1901 the family were living at 6 Boreham Terrace, Warminster, with Joseph's father being a retired watchmaker. In 1901, Joseph was a student at St.Mary's College, Woolhampton, Berkshire. He emigrated to Victoria, British Columbia, Canada in 1903, and enlisted at Valcartier, Quebec. He joined the 16th. Bn. Canadian Scottish, number 28682. That regiment was part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in the 1st. Canadian Division. They were subjected to a chlorine gas attack on the 22nd. of April 1915, when Joseph was killed. He was one of 382 Canadians killed on that day. At the time of his death, Joseph's parents were living at 'Torwood', 20 Boreham Road, Warminster.      



                        

Walter Titford was born in Warminster during 1895, the son of Frank and Alice Titford (nee Carpenter). During 1891 his parents were living at 16 Hillwood Lane, Warminster, and by 1911 had moved to14 Woodcock, with Walter working as an errand boy. He enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 9424. At some stage he seems to have transferred to the Army Cyclist Corps, regimental number 5632. At the time of his death, Walter was serving as a private in the 11th.Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, regimental number 36490. He was killed in action, age 21 on the 14th.of May 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. Walter was buried in the Naval Trench Cemetery, Gavrelle, D 10, which is about 8 kilometres north east of Arras, in the Pas-de-Calais region of France. At the time of Walter's death his parents were living at 5 The Furlong, Warminster. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, plus the 1914-1915 Star, having entered the Balkans on the 21st.of August 1915.

                        

The Army 'dead' records say this was Arthur Edward Titt, however he died in 1950. I believe that it should be Arthur Edwin Titt, born in Warminster around November 1883. He was the son of William (1842-1918) and SarahTitt (nee Franklin, 1843-1925). In 1891 Arthur was living with his mother Sarah, a charwoman at 53 West Street, Warminster. On Christmas Eve 1913 he married Mabel Zipporah Sheppard at Longbridge Deverill. Arthur enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 7014. Arthur was killed in action on the 20th.of September 1914 in France, whilst serving as a private.
He is commemorated on the La Ferte sous Jouarre Memorial, Seine et Marne.
He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, together with the 1914 Star. Mabel was re-married on the 30th. of March 1918 at Longbridge Deverill to George Jolliffe.

                        

James Franklin Titt was born during 1871 in Warminster, the son of Sarah Titt a charwoman, who in 1891 was living with her eldest son James, a maltster's labourer at 53 West Street, Warminster. He enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire and was enrolled into the 4th.Battalion, South Wales Borderers.Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 13311, James was killed in action on the 30th.of August 1916 in the Mesopotamia campaign. He was buried in the Amara War Cemetery IV B 10. Having entered the Balkans on the 19th.of July 1915, he was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Frank Tucker was born in Warminster around 1888, the son of Charles James (1853-1924), a coachbuilder and Augusta A. Tucker (nee Daniell 1851-1910). During 1891 they were living at 79 Portway in Warminster. During 1911 Frank was a boarder at 59 Pound Street, Warminster and working as a domestic coachman. He married Ada Selway in St.Denys' Church, Warminster in 1911, and they moved to Monkton Combe, near Bath in Somerset. He enlisted at Swindon, and joined the Royal Army Service Corps, number M2/050684, part of 6th. Division, Mechanical Transport. Frank died on the 23rd. of May 1918, and was buried in the Esquelbecq Military Cemetery 11 D 18. At the time of his death his wife was living at Slade Cottage, Monkton Combe. Frank is also commemorated on a plaque affixed to the pulpit in St. Michael's Church. Monkton Combe. 

                        

William Charles Turner was born in Warminster during 1885, the second son of George and Emily J.Turner, who in 1891 were living at 18 Bread Street, Warminster. In 1901 the family were still there, with William working as a bricklayer, just like his father. By 1911 his father was dead, and the family were living at 11 Upper Bread Street. Whilst living at Shrewton, Wiltshire, William enlisted at Salisbury and was enrolled into the Royal Corps of Engineers. Whilst serving as a sapper in the 95th. Field Company, regimental number 108669, he was killed in action on the 10th.of January 1917.
He was buried in the Frankfurt Trench British Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, D1.William was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Eustace Tom Udall was born during 1893 at Crockerton, near Warminster. He was the eldest son of Tom and Emma (Emily) Udall, who in 1901 were living at Five Ash Lane, near to Job's Mill at Crockerton. At that time, Tom senior was a navvie on the railway. During 1911 the family were living at Sutton End, Crockerton with 'Tom' working as a grocers errand boy. Eustace volunteered for service in Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1/4 th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 201972, Tom died on the 11th.of April 1918 during the Egyptian campaign. He was buried in the Kantara War Cemetery D 134.
He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 3a, George Street, Warminster.

                        

Herbert George Webber was the second son of Frederick and Emily Webber, and was born in Warminster during 1897. In 1901 the family were living at 1 Carson's Yard, Warminster with Frederick employed as a carter in the corn market. By 1911 his family had moved to 3 Horseshoes Yard in Warminster and Herbert was staying with his uncle Lewis Henry Smith at Burton Christchurch, Hampshire. He enlisted at Bournemouth, Hampshire, and was enrolled into the Royal Army Service Corps, regimental number T/36027. Whilst serving as a driver, he died in India on the 3rd.of November 1918. He was buried in the Bangalore (Hosur Road) Cemetery.  
I have no record of any medals that he might have been awarded.

                        

Cyril Whatley was the third son of George W. and Maria Whatley (nee Garrett), and born in Warminster during 1895. In 1901 the family were living at 41 West Street, Warminster with George employed as a maltster's labourer. Ten years later they seem to have moved to 4 West Street with Cyril working as a patent turner at a shirt factory. He enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 6th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 22693. Cyril was killed in action whilst serving as a private on the 1st.of September (or October) 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery X23, about 8 kilometres south of Ieper (Ypres). Cyril was awarded the Victory and British War medals. At the time of his death, his parents were living at 10 Bleeck's Buildings, West Street, Warminster.

                        

Harry John Udall was the eldest son of Henry and Emily Whatley and was born in Sutton Veny, Wiltshire during 1900. In 1901 the family were living at Deverill Road, Warminster, Henry being listed as a farmer's son. In 1911 they were living in Sutton Veny. Harry volunteered at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1/4th.(T.F.) Battalion, Hampshire Regiment, regimental number 202016. Whilst serving as a private, he died on the 12th.of July 1917 during the Mesopotamia campaign.
He was buried in the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery V B 2. Cyril was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Percy Whatley was the eldest son of George and Maria Whatley, being born in Warminster during 1888. He was the elder brother of Cyril - see previous entry. In 1901 Percy was working as a labourer on a farm. He enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 23741. Percy was killed in action on the 18th.of October 1916 during the France/Flanders campaign, only seventeen days after his brother had been killed in France ! He had served as a private, and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 13 A, on the Baupaume to Albert road in the Somme area of France. Percy was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Henry Charles White was born in Witsbury, Dorset and enlisted at Warminster, into the Royal Horse Artillery / Royal Field Artillery, number 33087. Whilst serving as a driver in 'H' Battery, he died of his wounds on the 29th. of March 1918. He was buried in the Namps au Val British Cemetery, Somme, 1 B 7. 
Also, a Charles White was born in Tilshead, Wiltshire during 1893, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth White, his father having been born in Warminster. During 1911 the family were living in Tilshead with Charles employed as a waggoner on a farm. He enlisted at Devizes and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, number 19214. He was transferred to the 13th.Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers, regimental number 235309.He died of wounds in France on the 27th.of July 1917.

                        

William Victor White was the son of John and Mary Maria White (nee Usher), and was born in Warminster in 1898. During 1901 the family were living at 23 Silver Street, Warminster with John employed as an engine driver at a brewery In 1911 the family were living at 32 Silver Street with Victor working as a grocers' errand boy. Victor enlisted at Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire and was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 24218, Victor was killed in action on the 21st.of March 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. He is commemorated on te Pozieres Memorial, Panel 64.
He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

William Youdell was born during September 1880 in Warminster, the son of George and Julia Eliza Youdell (nee Lidbury). William married a widow, Sarah Elkins Davis in April 1909 and they appear to have had several children. In 1911 they were living at 5 Sambourne, Warminster with William working as a bricklayer's labourer. He enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the 5th. Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 3/253.Whilst serving as a private he was killed in action at Sari Bair during the Gallipoli campaign on the 10th.of August 1915. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial Panel 156-158, on the Eccabet to Bigali road, Turkey. William is listed as being the son of George and Julia of 78 West Street and husband of Sarah of 5 Sambourne Road, Warminster. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals, together with the 1914-1915 Star.

Men associated with Warminster, who fell in the Second World War 1939-1945
 (For confidential reasons, details of servicemen killed in this war are less comprehensive).

                        

I have no definitive information regarding this persons death, or connections with Warminster. A Leslie G.Baker, born in Chippenham during 1919 served as a gunner in the Royal Artillery, army number 1514740. He died during the Burma campaign on the 19th.of March 1945.

                        

Ernest G. Ball was born in Warminster during 1916, and his mother's maiden name was Timbury. He enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, army number 5574098. He died on the 9th.of October 1944 in the Western Europe campaign.

                        

A Francis Ball was born in Hampshire but lived in Wiltshire. At the time of his death, he was serving as a company quartermaster sergeant in the Corps of Military Police, army number 7686041. He died in the Far East on the 3rd.of June 1943

                        

I have no information regarding this person's military service, or any connections with Warminster.

                        

Similarly, I have no details about this person.

                        

I also have no information about this person.

                        

A William G.Carhart was born in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan during 1918 and enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, army number 5570717. He died on the 4th.of October 1944 during the Western Europe campaign.

                        

A Charles Cave was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire and was living in Wiltshire at the time of his death. He enlisted in the Royal Artillery and served as a gunner, army number 5730276. He died in the Middle Eastern campaign on the 16th.of April 1943.

                        

Richard George Chambers was born in Warminster during 1910, and enlisted in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. He died on the 21st.of November 1941 whilst serving as a sergeant, Army number 550545, during the Middle Eastern campaign.

                        

I have no definite links with this person and Warminster, but a Richard G.Claydon was born in the Devizes area during 1921, whose mother's maiden name was Faggetter.

                        

I have no information regarding this person's military service, or any links with Warminster.

                        

A James G.Collins, born in London, lived in Wiltshire and enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He died on the 13th.of February 1943 during the Burma campaign, and was serving as a lance corporal, army number 5570184.

                        

I have no definite details of this person's military service, or any connections with Warminster.

                        

A Walter S.Cousins was born in Somerset and served in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He died on the 10th.of July 1944 during the Western European campaign, whilst serving as a private, army number 5570548.

                        

A Harold Curtis was born in Warminster 1913, mother's maiden name Mollart. Harold H.Curtis was born and living in Wiltshire when he enlisted in the Coldstream Guards. He appears to have transferred to the Corps of Military Police, and died on the 7th.of March 1943 during the North Africa campaign. He was serving as a sergeant, Army number 5367780.

                        

I have no information regarding this person's military career, or links with Warminster.

                        

I have no details of this person's military service, or connections with Warminster, even though it is a surname with links to the area.

                        

An Albert W. Dredge was born in Warminster during 1912, mother's maiden name Barber, and an Albert P. Dredge born in the town during 1919, mother's maiden name Dredge. An Albert F.Dredge, born in Wiltshire enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, and died on the 23rd.of November 1944 during the Western Europe campaign. He was serving as a private, Army number 5569884.

                        

I have no details of this person's military service, or links to Warminster.

                        

Similarly, I have no information regarding this person.

                        

I have no details of this person's service, or connections with Warminster, but a family called Forde were living in the town in the 1920-1930s. A W.V. Forde was born in Chippenham, Wiltshire in 1920.

                        

I have no definite details of this person, but an Arthur J. Fox was born in Cricklade, Wiltshire in 1914 and died on the 4th.of February 1945 whilst serving in the Burma campaign. He was serving as a trooper, army number 5576212 in the 3rd, Carabiniers, Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards.

                        

James H.Gadd was born in Kent during 1920, but enlisted in Warminster. He joined the Royal Corps of Signals, and died on the 19th.of June 1943 during the Far East campaign. He was serving as a signal man, Army number 4625897.

                        

I have no information with regard to this person's military service, or links to Warminster.

                        

An Edward R.R.Hannon was born in Pontypridd, Glamorgan during 1919 and was living in Kent when he enlisted in the Queen' s Royal (West Surrey) Regiment. He died in the United Kingdom on the 24th.of February 1941, whilst serving as a private, Army number 5572006.

                        

I have no information regarding this person's military record or any links with Warminster. n.b. A William I.J.Hinton was born in Warminster during 1922, his mother's maiden name being Cluett.

                        

Charles W. Holton was born in Warminster during 1913, his mother's maiden name being Greenland. He died on the 23rd.of April 1943 whilst serving as a bombardier, Army number 828161 in the Royal Artillery, and during the North Africa campaign.

                        

Harold John Holton was born in Warminster during 1907, and in 1938 he married Florence E.Stokes in the town. He died on the 4th.of January 1945 whilst serving as a bombardier, army number 1730748 in the Royal Artillery, during the Balkans and Greece campaign.

                        

I have no details of this person's connections with Warminster, or military service.

                        

Cyril E.Hudd was born in Warminster during 1918, his mother's maiden name being Hibbard. He died on the 25th. of October 1942, in the Middle East campaign, whilst serving as a private, army number 5571988 in the Queen's Royal (West Surrey) Regiment.

                        

I have no local information or military service records information.

                        

I have no local information or military service records information.

                        

I have no local information or military service records information.

                        

I have no local information or military service records information.

                        

Wilfred F.Pearce was born in Warminster during 1920, his mother's maiden name being Baker. He died on the 7th.of August 1944, whilst serving as a private, army number 5570547 in the Hallamshire Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment. In June 1944 that battalion attacked Fontenay-le-Pesnel before carrying out attacks on Le Havre, Nijmegen and Arnhem. During the operations the battalion lost 158 men killed and 689 wounded.

                        

A Bernard R.Penn was born in Warminster during 1918 his mother's maiden name being Dungworth. He died on the 25th.of November 1942 whilst serving a s a corporal army number 7264195 in the Royal Army Medical Corps, and during the North Africa campaign.

                        

No-one with these initials appears in the Army, R.A.F. or Royal Navy 'dead', but a Jack O.Phelps was born in Calne during 1923 and died on the 2nd.of August 1944 during the Italian campaign. He served as a guardsman, army number 2623053 in the Grenadier Guards

                        

I have no details of this persons military career, or of any connection with Warminster.

                        

Albert Edward Prince was born in Warminster during 1908 and died in India on the 31st.of July 1944. He was serving as a gunner, Army number 1690926 in the Royal Artillery.

                        

I have no information regarding any connection with Warminster, or military service for this person.

                        

Worthy George Salmons was born during December 1909 in Warminster, the son of Worthy George Grist (1889-1958) and Nora Salmons (1889-1912), who had married in Warminster during April 1910. During 1911, the family were living at 26 Brook Street, Warminster. 'George' married Evelyn May Dewey (1907-1994) in Warminster during June 1938. 'George' Salmons died on the 4th. of June 1945 during the Far East Campaign, whilst serving as a driver, in the Royal Army Service Corps, number 235215. He was buried in the Labuan War Cemetery, Malaysia.
n.b. A William George Salmons was born in Warminster during 1909 and died in April 1912.

                        

Douglas Sherwood was born in Amesbury, Wiltshire during 1917, the son of Albert John and Elizabeth Sherwood (nee Meech). He died on the 9th.of March 1945 during the Western Europe campaign, serving as a guardsman, Army number 2656996 in the Coldstream Guards.

                        

Raymond A.E.Silcox was born in Warminster during 1924, his mother's maiden name being Sims. He died on the 17th.of February 1945 during the Western Europe campaign, whilst serving as a bombardier, army number 14353424, in the Royal Artillery.

                        

Henry James Stokes was born during 1919 in Warminster. His father Frederick was a carpenter and wheelwright, born in Road, Somerset, and his mother Elizabeth (nee Carpenter) was born in Warminster. During 1911 they were living at 40 Brook Street, Warminster. Henry had six brothers and six sisters. He died of wounds on the 16th.of May 1944 during the Italian campaign, whilst serving as a private in the 2nd.Battalion Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. His Army number was 5674866. He was buried in the Beach Head Cemetery at Anzio, south of Rome. 

                        

William P. Stokes was born during 1917 in Warminster, and was the brother of Henry James (see above). He died of wounds on the 27th.of March 1945 during the Burma Campaign. At the time he was serving as a private in the West Yorkshire Regiment, Army number 4618475. William was buried in Yangon, Burma (now Myanmar).
n.b. Information was supplied by Robert Sanders, whose mother was one of Henry and William's sisters. 

                        

Dennis Patrick Teichman was born in Bromley, Kent during 1915, the son of Oskar and Edith Henrietta Teichman (nee Harbord). The family were living in Warminster when Dennis enlisted in the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. He died on the 8th.of July 1944 during the Normandy campaign, whilst serving as a major, army number 65245. Major Teichman had been awarded the Military Cross.

                        

Philip Raymond Teichman was the brother of Dennis and born in Reading, Berkshire in November 1912. He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), and at some stage transferred to the Parachute Regiment. He died in 1942 during the North Africa campaign and was also serving as a major, army number 64263. Of their parents, who lived at 'Highbury', Boreham, Warminster, Oskar died in 1959 and Edith in 1964.

                        

A John Thorne was born in Devon and lived in Wiltshire at the time of his enlistment. He joined the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry and died on the 11th.of December 1942 during the Middle East campaign. He was serving as a trooper, Army number 322956.

                        

The only individual that fits from the Army 'dead' is a Christopher W. Turner who was born in Swindon, Wiltshire during 1916 and joined the Royal Artillery. He died on the 2nd.of September 1941 in the United Kingdom. He was serving as a gunner, army number 1083315.

                        

I have no information regarding this person and the military 'dead' or of any connections with Warminster. However, a family called Watson were living in the town during the 1930s.

Men associated with Warminster, who fell since World War II
( added June 2010 )

                        

Squadron Leader Harold James Fitz was educated at Warminster Secondary School, his father was a blacksmith in The Furlong. As the pilot of an Avro Lincoln, he was shot down by a Russian MIG 15 over Lunenburg, in the Hamburg – Berlin Corridor on the 14th.of March 1953. He and six other crew members perished whilst on a training flight from Leconfield in Yorkshire

                        

Anthony Hotine, aged 21 was serving as with 40 Royal Marine Commando, when he was killed whilst on a foot patrol in the Sangin area, Helmand Province, Afghanistan on the 2nd.of June 2010. He was born in Torquay, Devon, but his family moved to Warminster, where Anthony attended Kingdown School.

HORNINGSHAM WAR MEMORIAL
Located at the junction of Church Street and Pottle Street.
WW1

Lord Alexander Thynne
John Henry Bothwell
James Carpenter
John Carpenter
Jesse Carrier
Percy (William) Carter

(Joe) Ernest Chapman
Dennis Curtis
Frederick (John) Curtis
Henry (Harry) Curtis
Wilfred Duff
Charles (William) Froude

Ernest (John) Garrett
William Houlton
Edwin (Thomas) Lewer
Henry (Charles) Marsh
(Lindley) Walter Miller
Reginald (Tom) Moore

Prowse Russell
Sidney Tancock
Wyndham Trollope
Sidney Wheeler
Charles (Edwin) Wyman


                        

Lord Alexander George Thynne was born in February 1873 in London, the son of John Alexander Thynne (1831-1896), 4th.Marquis of Bath, and the Hon. Frances Isabella Catherine Thynne (nee Vesey), (1840-1915). During 1891 the family were living at 48 Berkeley Square, Mayfair, and upon his father's death in 1896, the eldest son, Thomas Henry became the 5th.Marquis of Bath. Alexander then became Viscount Weymouth. By 1900 Alexander had joined the army and served in the Boer War 1900-2 and in Somaliland 1903-4. During 1910 he was elected an M.P. for Bath. Whilst serving as temporary Lt.Col of the Service Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, and a major in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry. He was killed in action on the 14th.of September 1918. During 1917 he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, was mentioned in dispatches, and received the Croix de Guerre. At the time of his death, his seat was Norton Hall, Daventry, Northamptonshire, and he was unmarried. His nephew, Lord John Alexander Thynne, son of Thomas Henry was killed in action during 1916, aged 21,-see Longbridge Deverill memorial.

                        

John Henry Bothwell was the son of Dr. James and Annie Bothwell, who were both born in Dublin, Ireland. John was born during 1883 in Horningsham, and during 1901 was living at 17 Vicarage Street, Frome working as a grocers' assistant. In 1911 he was boarding at Britannia Square, Worcester and working as a grocer's traveller. He enlisted at Stow-on-the Wold, Gloucestershire into the 2/4th.City of Bristol Territorial Regiment, regimental number 202626. He was killed in action, whilst serving as a private, on the 27th.of August 1917 during the France/Flanders campaign. His battalion had entered France in January 1915 and he was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

James Carpenter was born in Horningsham in 1895, the son of Worthy and Elizabeth Carpenter (nee Hale). During 1901 and 1911, the family were living at 84 Water Lane, Horningsham, his father being a general farm labourer, and James a cowman in 1911. James enlisted at Taunton, Somerset and was enrolled into the 8th. Battalion (Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry, regimental number 17715. His battalion entered France in October 1915, and James, a private was killed in action on the 6th.of December 1915. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

John Carpenter was born during 1882 in Horningsham, son of Worthy and Elizabeth and older brother of James – see above. In 1891 the family were living at the Parsonage, Horningsham. By 1911 John had married Elizabeth......... from Nunney, Somerset, and was living at Charlock Hill, Hill Deverill. John enlisted at Guildford, Surrey and was enrolled into the 2nd. Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment regimental number 5730. His battalion entered France in October 1914 and he was killed in action whilst serving as a private, on the 12th.of March 1915. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star.

                        

Jesse Carrier was born during 1890 in Frome, Somerset, the son of Frederick and Ellen Carrier (nee Elkins). In 1891 the family were living at Hollies Lodge, Frome, with Frederick employed as a gamekeeper. By 1901 the family had moved to Keepers Lodge, Parkhill, Horningsham, having lived for some years at Dilton Marsh. In 1911 Jesse was living at Cannon Dell, West Tisted near Alresford, Hampshire and employed as an under gamekeeper. He enlisted at Findon, Sussex and was enrolled into the 16th.Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number TF/315272, he died on the 19th.of September 1918, and was buried in St.Sever Cemetery extension, Rouen, France. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. n.b. A previous Jesse Carrier had been born in Horningsham during 1832.

                        

Percy (William) Carter was born during 1890 in Horningsham, the son of Henry and Charlotte Carter. In 1891 the family were living at 107 West Common, Horningsham, his father being a carpenter on the Longleat Estate, and by 1901 were still there. In 1911 the family were still there, with Percy employed as a carpenter. He enlisted at Warminster and joined the Somerset Light Infantry, regimental number 21958. He was later transferred to the 6th.Battalion, Queen's Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, regimental number T/F 241242. Percy was killed in action on the 14th.of October 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Percy was buried at Windmill British Cemetery, Monchy-le-Preux.

                        

(Joe) Ernest Chapman was born during 1883 in Horningsham, the son of William F. and Martha Ann Chapman. During 1891, the family were living at The Lodge, Longleat Park, with Ernest's father working as a general labourer. By 1901, the family had moved to Longleat Kitchen Gardens, with William employed as a domestic gardener. At the time of his enlistment, Ernest was living at Stanmore in Middlesex and enlisted at Harrow in that county. He was enrolled into the 7th.Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London), regimental number GS/26683. Whilst serving as a private, Ernest was killed in action on the 13th.of November 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        


Dennis Curtis was the ninth son and fourteenth child out of fifteen that survived infancy of William and Emily Curtis, and was born in Horningsham during 1892. In 1901 the family were living at Post Office Lane, Horningsham, with William employed as a chair stuffer. Before that they had lived at 198 Pottle Street, in the village. Dennis served a six-year apprenticeship as a chair maker and French polisher. In 1911 Dennis was a boarder at 157 Horningsham, and was employed as a house painter on the Longleat Estate. He enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the 13th. Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. His battalion entered France in July 1915. Whilst serving as a lance corporal, he died of his wounds on the 19th.of July 1916, during the Battle of the Somme, in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1914-1915 Star. Dennis was buried in the Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L'Abbe.

                        

Frederick (John) Curtis was born during 1878 in Horningsham, the son of Joseph and Annie Curtis. In 1891, the family were living at 6 Hitcombe Bottom, Horningsham, with Joseph working as a general labourer. Some time before 1901, Frederick had married Edith … and were living at 11 Islip Street, St.Pancras, Camden Town, London. His wife had been born in New Brompton, Kent and Frederick was employed as a dairy manager. During 1911 they were living at 27 Oval Road, Regents Park Road, north west London. Frederick was working as a bus conductor for London General. He enlisted in London, and was enrolled into the 9th.(Service) Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 20904, he died of his wounds on the 5th.of July 1916 during the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Frederick was buried in the St.Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.

                        


Harry Curtis was born around May 1890, the son of Joseph, an agricultural labourer and Annie Curtis (nee Arnold). During 1891 they were living at 6 Hitcombe Bottom, Horningsham. At that time, Harry had four brothers and four sisters. By 1901 the family had moved to 96 Lodge Fields, Horningsham, and in 1911 Harry was a boarder at 20 West End, Bruton, Somerset. He was working as a labourer on a farm. He married Mabel Curtis in the Wincanton area of Somerset late in 1914. He enlisted at Taunton, Somerset and was enrolled into the 5th.(Prince of Wales's) Battalion (Territorials), Devonshire Regiment, number 13583.That battalion entered France on the 22nd. of September 1915. Whilst serving as a private, he died of his wounds on the 3rd.of September 1918, during the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt. Details of his medals were for the 10th. Battalion, Dorsetshire Regt. 
He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. At the time of his death, his wife  Mabel was living at 10 St.Catherine's Hill, Bruton. 

                        

I have no information regarding this man's association with Horningsham, or any military service.

                        

Charles (William) Froude was born in Horningsham in 1888, the son of Charles and Martha Jane Froude. During 1891, the family lived at Park Hill, Horningsham and Charles senior was employed as a gamekeeper. By 1901, Charles senior had died and the family were living at 181 Tompkins Pool, Horningsham. During 1909, Charles was employed as a woodman for the Marquis of Bath, but seems to have later moved to Derbyshire. He married Emily Rydout in December 1914 at Baslow, Derbyshire. During 1915, Charles, who was living at Chatsworth enlisted at Chatham, Kent. He appears to have been enrolled into the Royal Engineers, number 187832, and later transferred to the 7th. Battalion, Prince of Wales's Volunteers (S. Lancashire) Regiment, regimental number 37445. Whilst serving as a private, he died of his wounds on the 30th.of December 1917, during the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Charles was buried in the Rocquigny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery, near Manancourt. His wife was then living at The Gardens, Chatsworth, Bakewell, Derbyshire.

                        

Ernest (John) Garrett was the fourth son of Archibald and Ellen Jane Garrett, and born in Horningsham during 1893. During 1901, the family were living at 212-213 Pottle Street, Horningsham, with Archibald employed as a woodcutter on an estate. In 1911 the family were still living there with Ernest employed as a general labourer. He enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire) Regiment. Whilst serving as a private, regimental number 23606, he died of his wounds on the 14th.of June 1917, during the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Ernest was buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery, France.

                        

William Houlton could be the same man as William Thomas Holton who appears on the Warminster monument. However, a William Charles Houlton was born in Frome during 1891, the son of Edward, a tailor's traveller and Hanna Houlton. From 1891-1911 the family lived at 11 Summerhill, Frome, and in the latter year, William was employed as a hairdresser. He was killed in action on the 8th.of July 1916 in western France. He was serving as a private in the 2nd.Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, number 19016. At that time of his death, his address was in Weymouth, Dorset.

                        

Edwin (Thomas) Lewer was born in Frome, Somerset during 1889, the son of William Henry and Sarah Ann Lewer. During 1891, the family were living at Forest Lodge, Frome with William employed as a gamekeeper. In 1901 their address was given as Forest Cottage, West Woodlands House, Selwood Forest, Frome. According to the military records, Edwin was born in Horningsham, but the census records have him being born in Frome. He was the brother of John Lewer – see Warminster memorial. In 1911 Edwin was boarding at Quidhampton, Salisbury, and employed as a wheelwright. He enlisted at Devizes, and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment. That battalion entered France in January 1915, and whilst serving as a lance corporal, regimental number 10261, Edwin was killed in action on the 2nd.of September 1915. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres in Belgium. At the time of Edwin's death, his father was living at The Hollies, East Woodlands, Frome.

                        

Henry (Charles) Marsh was born in Horningsham during 1895, the son of Charles and Amanda Marsh (nee Carpenter). In 1901, the family were living at 51 Rowe's Hill, Horningsham, and Charles was working as a forest labourer. In 1911 they were still living there, with 'Harry' working as a farm labourer. He enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1/7th.Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, regimental number 241838. Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 25th.of April 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. He is commemorated on the Thiepval memorial. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

(Lindley) Walter Miller was born in Horningsham late in 1893, the son of Thomas and Augusta Miller (nee Grist). In 1901 the family were living at 51 White Square, Horningsham, with Thomas employed as a woodman. In 1911 Lindley or 'Jack' was living with his uncle, John G. Mitchell at 10 The Square, Calne. Lindley's mother Augusta had died at the end of 1901. He enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 22737. Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 15th.of October 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. Walter was awarded the Victory and British War medals. His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and face 13 A. At the time of Lindley's death, his father Tom was living at 13 Gentle Street, Horningsham.

                        

Reginald (Tom) Moore was born in Westwood, Bradford-on-Avon about 1893. He was the son of Albert and Anne Moore. In 1911 they were living at Upper Westwood, with Reginald working as a farm labourer. In 1917 he married Mabel Harriet Pinchin at Melksham, and he was running his own coal merchants in Trowbridge. He was killed in action on the 1st.of December 1917 in France whilst serving as a sergeant in the Royal Horse Artillery, number 16237.

                        

Russell Bertram Miles Prowse was born in 1896, the eldest son of Reuben and his first wife, Mary Jane Prowse (nee Miles). Reuben was one of seventeen children of William and Mary Anne Prowse (nee Pengelley), who originally came from Devon. During 1911 Reuben (a domestic gardener) and Mary's family were living at 37 Church Street, Maiden Bradley, with Russell 15, Allen 12, Harrold 8 and George 11 months. Russell enlisted at Taunton and was enrolled in the Royal Army Medical Corps as a private No. 10901. He was aboard the H.M. Hospital Ship Salta, on the 10th. of April 1917,when she hit a mine about a mile off Le Havre. She sank within ten minutes, with 9 nurses, 42 from the R.A.M.C. and 79 crew of the 205 aboard being drowned. Russell was buried in the Sainte Marie Cemetery, Le Havre. At the time his parents were living at 3 Kingston Lane, Maiden Bradley. Why his name appears on the Horningsham memorial is not known.

                        

Sidney Tancock appears to be the same man as the one commemorated on the Warminster memorial – see that entry.

                        

Wyndham Trollope was born in 1894, the son of William (1855-1948)and Sophia Trollope (nee Barber) (1863-1952), who were born in Horningsham. During 1901 the family were living at 182 Tompkins Pool, Horningsham, with Wyndham aged 7 with four brothers and two sisters. By 1911 the family had moved to 209 Pottle Street in the village, but Wyndhgam is not living with them. However, he arrived in Montreal, Canada in August 1912, and moved to Buffalo, New York state in April 1914. He joined the Canadian Infantry as a private NO. 171546. He died on the 13th. of May 1917, and was buried in the Etaples Cemetery VXX A 10.  
n.b. A Walter Trollope was born on Christmas Eve 1883 in Horningsham, the son of Thomas and Mary Trollope. During 1901, the family were living at West Ashton Hill, Westbury, and Thomas was working as a carter on a farm, whilst Walter was a horseman on a farm. On the 9th.of December 1905, Walter married Elizabeth Mary Jones in Trowbridge. In 1911 they were living at Wolley Park Cottages, Bradford-on-Avon, they had two children and Walter was working as a farm labourer. He enlisted in Trowbridge, and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 5925. That battalion entered France in September 1914. Whilst serving as a private, he died of his wounds on the 5th.of July 1916 in the France/Flanders campaign. Walter was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, Picardie. 

                        

According to the CWGC website, a Sidney Wheeler buried in St.Pater and St. Paul churchyard, Longbridge Deverill died on the 8th. of December 1919, location not given. He was a lance corporal No. 61973 in the Devonshire Regt. before being transferred to the 651st.Agricultural Coy. Labour Corps, No. 190913. There does not appear to be a service or pension record for him.

                        

Charles (Edwin)Wyman, a person of this name was born in Salisbury in June 1889, son of George and his second wife, Barbara Fry. In 1901 he was living with his grandmother Ann Fry at Compton Chamberlayne. He was still there in 1911, employed as a shepherd. He enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 26348. Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 24th.of March 1918 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. His name is on the Arras memorial.

IMBER WAR MEMORIAL
 ( The wooden memorial of 1920 is now located in St.Giles Church, Imber )
WW1

Harold (Henry) Kitley      Ernest Marsh     Arthur (Edward) Norris

                        

Harold (Henry) Kitley was born in Langstone, Hampshire during 1899, the son of Henry (born in Shrewton) and Frances Kitley (nee Alexander). During 1901 the family were living in Farlington, Hampshire were Henry was employed as a coachman. He died the following year, and in 1911 Harold was living with his step-father Frank Ernest Grant at Orcheston, near Shrewton, Wiltshire. Harold, whilst living at Codford enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 33603. Later, he was transferred to the 1st.Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, regimental number 30753. Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 4th.of October 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

                        

Ernest Marsh was born in December 1895 in Imber, the son of Edward and Fanny Clara Marsh (nee Gibbs). During 1901 the family were living at East Street, Imber and Edward was employed as a farm labourer. In 1911 the family were living at 4 Eastview, Imber, with Ernest working as a farm labourer. Whilst living at Codford, Ernest enlisted at Warminster and was enrolled into the 6th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 22697. Whilst serving as a private, he was killed in action on the 22nd.of August 1916 during the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. Ernest was buried in the Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery.

                        

Arthur (Edward) Norris was born late in 1893 at Stourton, Wiltshire, the son of George and Mary Elizabeth Norris. During 1901, the family were living at Shave Mead, Stourton, with George employed as a farm labourer. In 1911 the family were living at Imber, with Arthur working as a horseman on a farm. Whilst living at Bath, he enlisted at Devizes and was enrolled into the 5th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 9441. That battalion entered the Balkans in June 1915. Whilst serving as a private, Arthur was killed in action on the 10th.of August 1915, during the Gallipoli campaign. At the time of his death, his parents were living in Norton Ferris, Kilmington, Bath. Ernest was awarded the Victory, British War medals and the 1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.

LONGBRIDGE DEVERILL WAR MEMORIAL.
( The memorial is inside St Peter and St.Paul's Church, Longbridge Deverill )
WW1

George William Barnes
Joseph Arthur Barnes
William John Bryant
Charles Coles
Herbert Stafford Cox

Mornington (Morny) Gale
Frank Edward Gray
(George) ErnestvJolliffe
Harry Miles
William Mitchell


Enos Molden
John Alexander, Viscount Weymouth
Albert Clarke White
Henry Robert White

WW2

Albert John Balcombe Louis Ball Alfred George Harris Leonard Russell Hunt Leslie Henry Snelgrove

                        

George William Barnes was born in Longbridge Deverill during 1885, and was the elder son of George and Anna (Hannah) Barnes. Before her marriage, Hannah was a silk spinner in Crockerton. During 1901, the family were living at 52 Sand Street, Longbridge Deverill, with George employed as an agricultural labourer, and George junior as a horse lad on a farm. In 1911 the family were still there, and both men employed as before. George joined the army in December 1914 and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 18266. His active service began at Messines. On one occasion, he went out in front of two British tanks, and single handedly captured a German machine gun post. For that action, George was postumously awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on the 16th. of August 1917. After Messines he served at Ypres, where he was a stretcher-bearer, a job at which he was highly regarded by his officers. He was killed in action when he was hit by shell splinters on the 5th.of August 1917, during the third battle of Ypres, and at the time he was a private. George is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres. He was unmarried, and 33 at the time of his death. 

                        

Joseph Arthur Barnes was born in 1887 and was the younger brother of George – see above. During 1901, he was working as a cattle lad on a farm, and on the 30th.of July 1913 he married Minnie, daughter of Harry King, a chair maker. Joseph joined the 3rd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 18292. I have no record of him being awarded any medals, so perhaps he did not serve abroad. He died in England on the 9th.of April 1915, and is buried in Longbridge Deverill churchyard. Joseph and Minnie had no children.

                        


William John Bryant was born in Durnford, Wiltshire in 1875, the son of Andrew and Alice Jane Bryant. During 1891, the family were living in South Street, Broad Chalke, south Wiltshire, Andrew working as a shepherd, and William as an agricultural labourer. Late in 1899 William married Jane Cooper in the Warminster district, and by 1901 they were living at Mid Lane, Gussage All Saint's, Wimborne, Dorset. William was at that time employed as a groom and gardener, and they had a son and daughter. The son William B. had been born in Chitterne, Wiltshire, and the daughter, Dorothy in Gussage. Between 1902-1914 more children were born to the couple. Edith Mary, Harold James, Leslie John, Arthur George, Kenneth Frank, Agnes Louise, Edward C., Sidney Frederick and Robert W. In 1911 they were living at 80 Sand Street, Longbridge Deverill, with William working as a cowman. William joined the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 18273. His battalion entered France in May 1915, and William was killed in action on the 15th.of June following, aged 38. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1915 Star. William is apparently commemorated on the Le Touret memorial in Belgium. In the four weeks before William's death, three of Jane's children Dorothy, Edward and Robert died early in 1915, and so after William's death she was left to bring up seven children under the age of 13! Sidney lived at No. 80 Sand Street until the early 1960s. 

                        

Charles Coles was born around 1881 in Crockerton, the son of Daniel and Ellen M. Coles. During 1891 the family were living at 118 Clay Street, Crockerton, with Daniel working as an agricultural labourer. Charles married Amelia (Amy Ellen) Maddock during January 1907 in Warminster district. She was the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Maddock of Potter's Hill, Crockerton. In 1911 they were living at 14 The Furlong, Warminster, with Charles working as a wine and spirits cellarman. He joined the Royal Berkshire Regiment, regimental number 25721 and was later transferred to the Labour Corps, army number 253779. Whilst serving as a private, he died on the 27th.of October 1918 during the France/Flanders campaign, just two weeks before the Armistice. He was buried in the Etaples Military Cemetery. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. There doesn't seem to have been any children, and on the 28th.of October1922, Amelia married Alfred Thomas Whatley in Longbridge Deverill.

                        

Herbert Stafford Cox was born late in 1887 in Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire, the son of Joseph and Ellen Cox. During 1901, the family were living at West End, Minchinhampton, Joseph working as a carpenter, and Herbert an errand boy. Having been educated at the Duke of York's Military School and Royal Hibernian Military School, Herbert enlisted at Gloucester on the 31st.of January 1906. In 1911 he was boarding at Earls Court Road, Amesbury, employed as a police constable for Wiltshire County Council. He married Rosina Hilda Earney at Minchinhampton on the 14th.of February 1912, and Olive Betty was born to them on the 5th.of October 1913 in the Warminster area. For a time, Herbert served as a police constable in Crockerton. As a reservist he was mobilized on the 5th.of August 1914 in London, and entered France with the British Expeditionary Force on the 19th.of October 1914. He returned to England in June 1915 and joined the 2nd.Battalion, Grenadier Guards on the 26th.of November 1915, regimental number 12581. He returned to France in November 1915, and was wounded by shrapnel in the right forearm on the 15th.of September 1916. He spent several months recovering in hospitals at Havre and Harfleur, and re-joined his battalion on the 17th.of December 1916. Whilst serving as a guardsman, he was gassed in a German attack at Arras on the 22nd.of February 1918, and hospitalized again, spent time at Abbeville, Abergavenny and Shoreham in Sussex. He was discharged from the army at Putney on the 26th.of July 1918. Unfortunately Herbert died, soon after returning to his home in the Warminster area. The tall, ex-policeman was awarded the Victory and British War medals, together with the 1915 Star.

                        

Mornington 'Morny' Gale was born in Shirley, Hampshire in July 1894, the son of Thomas Groves Gale and Jane Whittle Gale (nee Vane). During 1901, the family were living at 13 Station Road, Shirley with Thomas employed as a bricklayer. By 1911 the family had moved to 73 Jersey Hill, Crockerton, Wiltshire, with Morny employed as a laundry lad in a shirt factory. For a time the family lived at 49 Potters Hill, Crockerton, and Morny having a strong voice, was a valued member of Crockerton Church choir. He enlisted at Devizes and was enrolled into the 5th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 21127. That battalion entered the Balkans in November 1915. Mornington, serving as a private died of his wounds near Qurna, Baghdad, Mesopotamia on the 5th.of May 1916. He is commemorated on the Basra War Memorial, and was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1915 Star.
n.b. Mornington's brother, Louis born in 1893, emigrated to Australia in 1913 and joined the Australian army two years later. He was mentioned in dispatches, returned to Australia in 1919 and there married.

                        

Frank Edward Gray was born around 1879 at Crockerton, the son of William and Sarah A. Gray. At that time, William and Sarah were living at Potter's Hill, Crockerton. By 1901 the family were living at 20 Crockerton, William being a carpenter and shopkeeper, Frank also being a carpenter. In 1911 he was living at 4 North Road, Newbridge, Monmouthshire, employed as a carpenter. He enlisted at Fulham, London, and was enrolled into the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 10324. Whilst serving as a private, he was attached to a Red Cross hospital which was shelled, and Frank was wounded. He died on the 8th.of May 1918, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

(George) Ernest Jolliffe was born around 1887 at Clevedon, Bath, Somerset, the son of George and Emily Jolliffe. During 1891, the family were living in Clevedon with George senior employed as an engine driver. By 1901, the family had moved to 95 Thornhill, Crockerton, with George senior working as an engine driver in the water pumping station. Ernest by then 15, was a grocer's assistant. By 1911 the family were still at 95 Crockerton but at the time of Ernest's death were resident at 76 Sand Street, Longbridge Deverill. In 1911 Ernest was living at 1 The Bridge, Frome working as a shop assistant. He enlisted at Bath, and was enrolled into the Somerset Light Infantry, regimental number 21579. He later joined the 2nd.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 29719. Ernest was killed in action on the 8th.of April 1917, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

Harry Miles was born about 1883 at Heytesbury, Wiltshire, the son of Isaac and James Miles. During 1891 the family were living at the Manor House, Knook, with Isaac employed as a woollen cloth worker. By 1901, they had moved to 39 Frome Road, Trowbridge with Harry working as a railway engine stoker. He enlisted at Devizes and was enrolled into the Wiltshire Regiment, regimental number 10553. He was later transferred to the 6th. Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, regimental number 14319. Harry was killed in action at Gallipoli on the 9th.of August 1915.

                        

A William Mitchell was born in the Highwood district of Wiltshire (Heytesbury) in early 1887. Other than this, I have no information regarding any army or navy service or 'death', or local census details.

                        

Enos Molden was born in June 1877 at Ogborne St.George, Wiltshire, the son of Enos and Jane Molden (nee Tanner). In 1881, the family lived at The Orchard, Ogborne St.George, with Enos serving as a police constable. During 1891, the family lived in Shrewton, with Enos senior employed as a police sergeant. By 1901, he had died and Jane lived with her three sons at 5 Deverill Road, Warminster, with Enos junior working as a house painter. He married Annie Poolman on the 18th.of August 1904 at Longbridge Deverill. Whilst living at 10 Crockerton Green, their daughter Dora was baptised in December 1912. Enos enlisted in Warminster and was enrolled into the 6th.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 25956. He died on the 7th.of March 1917 during the France/Flanders campaign. He was buried in the Puchevillers British Cemetery in France, and was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

                        

John Alexander, Viscount Weymouth was born during 1895 at Whitcombe, Bath, Somerset, the eldest son of Thomas Henry Thynne, 5th.Marquess of Bath. His mother was Violet Caroline, Marchoness of Bath, and during 1901 the family were residing at Longleat House, Wiltshire. In 1911 he was attending Winchester College. The viscount joined the army in 1915, and was enrolled into the 2nd.Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys). He received training at York before his regiment entered France late in 1915. Early in January 1916 the 5th.Cavalry Battalion were sent to the front at Hulluch. On the 13th.of February 1916, the viscount whilst serving as a second lieutenant, was shot in the head and died about an hour later. During the night he died, his mother dreamt she saw him lying on a pile of blankets. This later proved correct as this was where he was placed after his death. He was buried in the Vermelles British Cemetery, about six miles north west of Lens. He was succeeded as viscount by his younger brother, Henry Frederick, who became the 6th.Marquis of Bath in 1946.

                        

Albert Clarke White was born in 1897 at Corsley, Wiltshire and was the son of Henry and Emma White During 1901 the family were living at 153 Crockerton, with Henry employed as a house painter. Albert enlisted at Devizes,and was enrolled into the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, army number 622551. He was later transferred to 214 Coy. Machine Gun Corps, number 106347.Whilst serving as a private he was killed in action on the 20th.of September 1917 in the France/Flanders campaign. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. His name is commemorated on the St. Julian Memorial.

                        

Henry Robert White was the elder brother of Albert, and born in 1884 at Maida Vale, Willesden in London. Their father, who was born in Crockerton had gone to London,where he worked on the buses. In 1891 the family were living in Gore Lane, Corsley, and by 1901 had moved to 152 Leaf Lane (also known as Paradise Lane) Crockerton. By that time, Henry was living at Weston Road in Portishead, Bristol. He was living with his grandparents, Joseph and Emma Rowles, and working as a labourer. In September 1905 Henry married Gertrude Mabel Woodward, daughter of a coachman at Warminster, and went to live at 127 Shear Cross, Crockerton, working as a painter and decorator. They had two children, Edgar Henry and Gertrude May. Henry enlisted at Warminster, and was enrolled into the 1st.Battalion, Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment, regimental number 5937.  Having served in South African campaign, his battalion entered France in October 1914. Henry was killed in action whilst serving in D Company the 16th.of June 1915. He was awarded the Victory, British War medals and 1914-1915 Star. His name is inscribed on the Ypres Memorial.
Harry and Emma also had two other sons who served at the front !

LONGBRIDGE-DEVERILL Second World War 1939-1945

                        

Albert John Balcombe was born during 1914 in Lewisham, Surrey, his mother's maiden name being Miller. Having completed his education, Albert joined the merchant navy, but spent his leave at relatives who lived at 98 Clay Street, Crockerton. He joined the armed steam merchant ship Sirikisha, owned by Christian Salvesen, which left Avonmouth, Bristol on the 6th.of February 1941, in ballast and bound for Halifax, Canada. She joined convoy OB288 off Liverpool and headed for the River Clyde, Glasgow. There she picked up the naval escort under Rear Admiral R.Plowden and headed west. On the 24th. of February, south of Iceland at 2.20 a.m. the Sirikishna left the convoy, and was hit by a torpedo from the German submarine U 96. The master, a commodore, five naval staff, two gunners and thirty four crew members including Albert abandoned the ship. At 8.30 a.m. she was torpedoed again and sank. All of the crew were reported as missing. Albert was serving as an acting able seaman C/JX 2171890. However local tradition in the Crockerton/Longbridge Deverill area says that Albert was rescued and joined the Royal Navy serving on HMS. Raleigh. He was sunk again, rescued and joined the submarine service. That could not have been easy as Albert was 6'3" tall. Apparently whilst off Japan his submarine was sunk on the 24th. of February 1941 and all hands were lost. It seems the tradition has the event mixed up with the sinking of the Sirikishna. Also there was no HMS. Raleigh in commission during World War II. In 1941 Albert was 29 and unmarried.

                        

Louis Ball was born in Rotherham, Yorkshire during February 1912, the son of John James and Hannah Ball. After school, Louis became a miner before he joined the army in 1931. As part of the 48/26 Field Brigade and received his initial training at Bulford Camp in Wiltshire. In 1934, he met Margaret I. Cowley, who was born at Kingston Deverill in 1911 and later worked in a shop at Salisbury. They married at Mexborough in Yorkshire, where their first son, Louis James was born in February 1935. They then moved to 96 Monkton Deverill, before moving to Mill Cottage, near Bull Mill, Crockerton. They had two other sons, Byron Robert and Peter William. Louis senior worked as a kiln burner at Crockerton Brick Works. Loius enjoyed watching horse racing, and often attended Salisbury, Wincanton and Doncaster meetings. Being a reservist, he was called up for army service in June 1939, and joined the 19th. Field Regiment, Royal Artillery. Louis was wounded at Dunkirk during 1940 and was returned to England to recover. Refusing the offer of a medical discharge, he re-joined his regiment and saw action in North Africa as a lance-bombadier. He was involved the Italian campaign, and was wounded on his thirty second birthday. He died a day later, on the 19th.of February 1944 at Anzio, where he was buried.

                        

Alfred (Fred) George Harris was baptised at Crockerton in June 1925, the only son of Henry William and Bessie Maud Harris (nee Trollope) of 129 Foxholes, Crockerton. Henry used to deliver newspapers, while Bessie ran a small shop from their home. Fred was a regular member of Crockerton Church choir, and was also a keen member of the local Boy Scouts troop, becoming scout leader.
He joined the Home Guard before enlisting in the Devonshire Regiment, regimental/army number 14610257. He was killed in action in Holland on the 19th.of January 1945, aged 19 and was buried in the Nederweert War Cemetery.

                        

Leonard Russell Hunt was born late in 1911 at Pontypridd, Glamorgan, south Wales, the son of Edward and Sarah Anne Hunt (nee Barnes), who were married at Bridgend, Glamorgan in 1907.The family moved to 38 The Marsh, Longbridge Deverill. Leonard joined the Essex Regiment, number 6026802, and was killed in action on the 23rd.of November 1943 in the establishing the Sangro River bridgehead in the Chieti region of Italy. He was buried in the Sangro River Cemetery on the Adriatic coast.

                        

Leslie Henry Snelgrove was born during October 1910 in Lambeth, Surrey the son of William Charles (1871-November 1940) and Louisa Snelgrove (nee Guy 1874-1967). William was born in Heytesbury and Louisa was born in Horningsham. They married in the latter place during 1895. Being one of their seven children, Leslie married Florrie E. Rose in Wandsworth, Surrey during1935 and lived in Edgware, Middlesex. Their daughter Joan F.'s birth was registered in Westminster in 1937. During 1939, Leslie's parents moved back to Wiltshire, and lived at 37 The Marsh, Longbridge Deverill (next to the Hunt family, see previous entry). Leslie worked as a meter collector for the Electricity Board. 
He enrolled in the Royal Artillery, as a gunner, number 1741281, and during the summer of 1941 was in camp in Devon. Whilst returning home on leave, the lorry carrying him crashed, and Leslie was thrown out and killed. He died on the 4th.of July 1941, and was buried in Longbridge Deverill.
Leslie's mother continued to live inLongbridge Deverill until the 1950s. She died in Essex during 1967, and her daughter Joan died in 1988.

REST IN PEACE


Unintentionally, errors will have been by myself or the authorities or the webmaster, but I urge anyone with any relevant information about the fallen to contact me, so that I may correct any possible existing website entries. Would anyone with any further information or corrections to the foregoing text please contact me at;

Mr. Ian Blackburn
58a Pound Street
Warminster, Wiltshire
01985 215107
blackburn107@btinternet.com 

I would like to thank Jacqueline Burrows,Colin Challinor, Den Curtis, Ivor Davies, David Dodge, Sarah James, Graham Read and Colin Taylor for their most valuable research and contributions.   


Research by Ian Blackburn & Website by Keith Rattray
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